Ne555p problems. Inexperienced. Help..

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,564
Also picked up a bunch of logic chips
If any of the parts are static sensitive, get yourself a grounding strap and an antistatic work surface.

This from a Jameco catalog:
clipimage.jpgclipimage.jpg

You don't have to connect the grounding strap on the mat to anything, but earth ground won't hurt. The important thing is to have the mat, parts, and you at the same potential.

You connect your antistatic strap to the mat strap.
I've learnt so much more the past few days not getting anything to work than I would have if it worked the first go.
I'd be careful about YouTube. Most of the videosI've seen are crap. There's a reason why they're so long; people are trying to monetize views and, apparently, they need you to watch for a minimum amount of time.
 

Thread Starter

Bbrandonparran

Joined Sep 8, 2020
24
If any of the parts are static sensitive, get yourself a grounding strap and an antistatic work surface.

This from a Jameco catalog:
View attachment 216790View attachment 216791

You don't have to connect the grounding strap on the mat to anything, but earth ground won't hurt. The important thing is to have the mat, parts, and you at the same potential.

You connect your antistatic strap to the mat strap.
I'd be careful about YouTube. Most of the videosI've seen are crap. There's a reason why they're so long; people are trying to monetize views and, apparently, they need you to watch for a minimum amount of time.
I will definitely look into these I actually had no idea about that being an issue. Thanks for the heads up!
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,564
I will definitely look into these I actually had no idea about that being an issue.
All CMOS logic (CD4xxx, CD45xx, 74HC, 74HCT, 74AC, 74ACT, you get the idea). All MOSFETs, white (maybe blue) LEDs. If it comes packed in antistatic foam, bags, or tubes it might be static sensitive. I say might because even components that aren't static sensitive are sometimes shipped in antistatic material.

EPROMs, FLASH, SRAM, DRAM, NVRAM, microprocessors, microcontrollers are all static sensitive.

Some say TTL is static sensitive, but I've stored parts in plastic trays for decades.

JFETs, BJTs, and passive components aren't static sensitive.
 

Thread Starter

Bbrandonparran

Joined Sep 8, 2020
24
All CMOS logic (CD4xxx, CD45xx, 74HC, 74HCT, 74AC, 74ACT, you get the idea). All MOSFETs, white (maybe blue) LEDs. If it comes packed in antistatic foam, bags, or tubes it might be static sensitive. I say might because even components that aren't static sensitive are sometimes shipped in antistatic material.

EPROMs, FLASH, SRAM, DRAM, NVRAM, microprocessors, microcontrollers are all static sensitive.

Some say TTL is static sensitive, but I've stored parts in plastic trays for decades.

JFETs, BJTs, and passive components aren't static sensitive.
Initiate googling of all the terms you just used>>lol
so if youtube videos are iffy. Are there any books/sites I could use in my free time to start learning more about circuitry and computers. I'm obviously not even familiar with the basics.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,564
Are there any books/sites I could use in my free time to start learning more about circuitry and computers. I'm obviously not even familiar with the basics.
I pity anyone trying to teach themselves electronics. The fact of the matter is that you don't have a solid foundation to build upon and you don't know enough to separate the wheat from the chad. People have done it. Jim Williams is a famous example. He was one of the best analog designers of his time and he didn't have a degree. But, if you come across any of the multitude of self taught people, they'll tell you that it's a long row to hoe and the sad thing is that you won't even know how ignorant you are.

My suggestion is to find some projects that really, really interest you and work on them until they work and then try to understand what every component does. Bill Hewlett used to do that when he was studying electrical engineering at Stanford.

Do you have someone near you who would mentor you?

EDIT: Add Jim Williams bio
https://computerhistory.org/blog/an-analog-life-remembering-jim-williams/
 

Thread Starter

Bbrandonparran

Joined Sep 8, 2020
24
I pity anyone trying to teach themselves electronics. The fact of the matter is that you don't have a solid foundation to build upon and you don't know enough to separate the wheat from the chad. People have done it. Jim Williams is a famous example. He was one of the best analog designers of his time and he didn't have a degree. But, if you come across any of the multitude of self taught people, they'll tell you that it's a long row to hoe and the sad thing is that you won't even know how ignorant you are.

My suggestion is to find some projects that really, really interest you and work on them until they work and then try to understand what every component does. Bill Hewlett used to do that when he was studying electrical engineering at Stanford.

Do you have someone near you who would mentor you?
Interesting. I can see how it would definitely be difficult. I know no one personally that's into electronics. That was my original goal was to just do projects as a hobby and learning experience. But I'm noticing on websites (and youtube) that it's hard to follow along without knowing what they're talking about. And somethings are hard google unless I know what I need to google. Which i dont lol. Like i said it's just a hobby but i dont want to be limiting my learning to "just a hobby". I wish to learn as much as I can. But if I don't no big deal. I did see a Harvard professor I forget his name who has a few very long lectures on youtube:confused:for introduction to electronics. Ireally need to learn the terminology because that's where I get lost.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,597
There is some good on Utube but it's like searching a haystack for a needle. The same can be said for books but there is one I will recommend. "Electronics Fundamentals Circuits, Devices and Applications" by Thomas L. Floyd and David L. Buchla. This will cover DC & AC fundamentals and introduce you to semiconductors. It is a College/Trade School textbook using only algebra and trig. It is up to the 12th edition now but the basics have not changed so an earlier edition either in a book or PDF can be found for little or no cost on the web. For books use: https://www.gettextbooks.com/ It will search 1000+ used and new book vendors for available books and their condition and cost with a link to buy. For free PDF or online loans: https://archive.org/ I like to also use them to look at a book before I buy it if I am interested in it. Lab manuals to go along with the textbook are also available. Another book along the same lines to consider is "Grob's Basic Electronics" by Mitchel E. Shultz which is now up to it's 13th edition. I like it's treatment a bit better in some areas due to it's use of dual linear algebra and complex numbers in dealing with phase relations of reactive circuits which Floyd does the more difficult algebraic way even though I think Floyd's book is better due to a more hands-on practical approach and includes troubleshooting concepts also. And Here on AAC you will find another online electronic textbook. Good Luck!
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,890
I cannot think of a better place to learn than right here on AAC forum itself. All posts are peer reviewed and any dubious advice will surely be pointed out very quickly.

Have you looked at the top of this page and checked out the AAC Education section as yet?
 

Thread Starter

Bbrandonparran

Joined Sep 8, 2020
24
I cannot think of a better place to learn than right here on AAC forum itself. All posts are peer reviewed and any dubious advice will surely be pointed out very quickly.

Have you looked at the top of this page and checked out the AAC Education section as yet?
And as friendly and willing to share this community seems. This is definitely now my go to site that's forsure. Honestly I was expecting some slight resentment for litteraly knowing nothing about electronics. And I'm checking that out now.
 

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
4,095
Best I could get with the lighting and my phone sorry.
Left is the original 555 that I got and i had effed up and shorted out. Now it gets extremely hot when plugged in. So I got a set (right) which closer inspection it doesnt look pitted but it does look scraped in some way. You can tell an obvious difference in quality. I'm marking this as faulty equipment because inhave no way of proving other wise and I've tried EVERY astable setup I've found on line with EVERY combination of resistors I have. And it does not give me any useable clock pulse.
Take your pictures with good daylight but not with sun shining on things.
I take many of each object of interest and immediately after select one of each. Do not keep bad ones.
 

Thread Starter

Bbrandonparran

Joined Sep 8, 2020
24
Every one thanks again for the help I've swapped the ne555 for an lmc555 and my 4 bit counter is ticking away. I can even adjust my timer properly. Lesson learned, buy legitimate items. :D
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,564
Every one thanks again for the help I've swapped the ne555 for an lmc555 and my 4 bit counter is ticking away
What counter is the LMC555 driving? CMOS? TTL?

If you're not planning to throw away the timers you had, at least test them in your circuit to see if any of them work.
 

Thread Starter

Bbrandonparran

Joined Sep 8, 2020
24
What counter is the LMC555 driving? CMOS? TTL?

If you're not planning to throw away the timers you had, at least test them in your circuit to see if any of them work.
It's the CMOS to my knowledge. And I already tested a few with no luck. I've set up my return and refund for all the chips i bought from amazon.
However i managed to hook up an 8 bit counter. so far all the chips from mouser 100%
 

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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,890
Don't toss out the NE555. There might be nothing wrong with it. They are useful for driving loads that need extra current current (200mA).
Compare datasheets with the CMOS versions.
NE555 takes about 10mA supply current. CMOS version takes about 0.5mA.

It is the glitches imposed on the supply lines that is causing the problem with NE555 timer chips.
 
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