I have made a flywheel with magnets attached and 4 power coils, not working out properly

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
Hi there, I have made a flywheel with magnets attached and 4 power coils. the machine makes 55-60 volts when I put in a 220 ohm resistor the current only reaches 0.1amps, what could be going wrong? the current should be 0.25amps!
 

ThePanMan

Joined Mar 13, 2020
757
Welcome to AAC.

To give you an appropriate answer we need to see a picture of your build along with a schematic on how it's wired; and what you expect from it. Please post pictures and schematic for further review.
 

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
I have put on an extra power coil since taking the pictures and also a much larger capacitor bank these are quite old pictures. I have neatened it up using choc blocks and also put a lcd screen and hall effect read by Arduino the fastest it turns is 550rpm the esc that runs the drone motor (golden) is run off of a separate Arduino attached to the side. It has lights on.
 

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sghioto

Joined Dec 31, 2017
5,368
Hi there, I have made a flywheel with magnets attached and 4 power coils. the machine makes 55-60 volts when I put in a 220 ohm resistor the current only reaches 0.1amps, what could be going wrong? the current should be 0.25amps!
What does the voltage read when the 220 ohm resistor is connected?
 

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
What does the voltage read when the 220 ohm resistor is connected?
Bring the magnets as close as a paperthin to the coils and increase the speed.
Also the magnets are as close as I can get them to the coil cores, any closer and then the magnets stick to the cores. I was thinking of dusting the magnets with iron filings so the cores make physical connection with the magnets.
I will have to measure the voltage after the resistor I am not sure when I wil be working on the machine next but will upload pictures when I do!
the machine gets unstable through vibration after 550RPM
Thanks for replies.
 

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
so I will be using a 20 500watt resistor! I just want to know one thing, I was going to put a 20ohm power resistor (500w) in line with the positive from the rectifier to the 55vdc then in to the the input of the inverter, to avoid shorting, is this necessary also if i do put the 20ohm resistor in then I want voltage after the resistor to be 55, so my question is do I need to have a higher starting voltage? if that makes sence because of voltage drop, thanks
 

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
so I will be using a 20 500watt resistor! I just want to know two things, I was going to put a 20ohm power resistor (500w) in line with the positive from the rectifier to the 55vdc then in to the the input of the inverter, to avoid shorting, is this necessary also if i do put the 20ohm resistor in then I want voltage after the resistor to be 55, so my question is do I need to have a higher starting voltage? if that makes sence because of voltage drop, thanks
 

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
so I will be using a 20 500watt resistor! I just want to know two things, I was going to put a 20ohm power resistor (500w) in line with the positive from the rectifier to the 55vdc then in to the the input of the inverter, to avoid shorting, is this necessary also if i do put the 20ohm resistor in then I want voltage after the resistor to be 55, so my question is do I need to have a higher starting voltage? if that makes sence because of voltage drop, thanks
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
8,654
What is the purpose of the 20 Ohm resistor? All it does is waste power.

How much power is used to spin the generator? You cannot get more power out than you put in.

If you are getting only 0.1A with the 220 resistor, which is 22V. Why do you expect to get 55V with a 20 Ohm resistor, which is 2.75A?
 

Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
I'm aware that you can't get more out than in. the 20 ohm resistor is to stop short circuit. The answer to the last question is there is 55 volts dc thats coming from the power coils ohms law states that V/R=I and so if it puts out 55v and the resistor of 220ohm the current should be 0.25amps not 0.1 I'm trying to figure out why I'm only getting 0.1amps! 55volts / 20 ohm = 2.75amps
 
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Thread Starter

Maglatron

Joined Nov 3, 2023
154
I tried to measure the current without any resistor and bassically there was a pop and carbon was deposited on the choc block connector
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
8,654
I'm aware that you can't get more out than in. the 20 ohm resistor is to stop short circuit. The answer to the last question is there is 55 volts dc thats coming from the power coils ohms law states that V/R=I and so if it puts out 55v and the resistor of 220ohm the current should be 0.25amps not 0.1 I'm trying to figure out why I'm only getting 0.1amps!
Putting a 20 Ohm resistor across the output does nothing to prevent a short circuit. I cannot even imagine what you are thinking.

A generator has a certain voltage output when there is no load. That is the highest voltage you will ever get out of it. Any load causes the output voltage to drop.

Why? The load draws a current through the coils. That produces a magnetic field that opposes the field from your magnets. Less field in the coils means less voltage.

You are expecting 55V across a 20 Ohm resistor. That is 151W. So I ask again, how much power is the motor running the generator putting in? If it is not well above 150W, you are not getting 150W out.
 
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