Text editor to code work

Thread Starter

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,461
What is the best editor in peoples opinion and why to edit the text when writing code
Is it best to go for an IDE , with its integrated text editor,
or an IDE with another editor,
or what
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,689
When I'm programming for Arduino's, I use the IDE they provide. For everything else, I use 'vi'.
For large Arduino sketches, I’ll write the code in Textpad with the C filter and then paste it into the IDE to check errors and try compiling.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,871
For large Arduino sketches, I’ll write the code in Textpad with the C filter and then paste it into the IDE to check errors and try compiling.
I haven't done any Arduino code large enough that made it worth editing outside of the IDE. I spend more time working around compiler bugs. It has gotten to the point where I take snapshots of working code before I make any major changes so I have something to fall back on.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
Is it best to go for an IDE , with its integrated text editor...
I'd say yes. I write iOS apps in Xcode (Swift language) and I can't imagine not using the integrated editor. Syntax checking, autocompletion, color cues, identification of matching brackets, auto-indent and format, and on and on and on.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
3,400
As others said, it depends on what you're doing. I've used edlin (remember that one), some ancient now-defunct full-screen generic text editor, Microsoft Notepad, whatever the heck the C package came with, and the Arduino IDE. Oh yeah, also pencil and paper then punched the card deck.
 

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
4,321
I used an independent text editor Notepad++, only when programming in RFO Basic for Android apps.

Otherwise, always whatever came with the IDE.
 
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djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,689
I haven't done any Arduino code large enough that made it worth editing outside of the IDE. I spend more time working around compiler bugs. It has gotten to the point where I take snapshots of working code before I make any major changes so I have something to fall back on.
I have an Arduino sketch that runs over 1,000 lines of code.
 

402DF855

Joined Feb 9, 2013
271
Microsoft's IDEs have been my favorites by far for ever, although I prefer the Pro versions as some features are trimmed of for the community editions. Oddly, I tried Microsoft Code and was underwhelmed. Notepad++ if Visual Studio isn't available. On Linux I'm stuck with vi or nano, both of which are ridiculously archaic, but there you go. Used IAR Embedded Workbench recently and it was functional but inferior in general. Eclipse was so bad I avoid it despite that it may have been improved.
 

upand_at_them

Joined May 15, 2010
766
I use UltraEdit for so many things. It is a great editor.

For Arduino, I use the Arduino IDE because it's a one-click to compile and upload. For PIC's, I almost never use the MPLAB(X) IDE and instead use UltraEdit, which I've configured to do a compile with a custom button.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
3,400
I used a terminal emulator so I could program using something better than the OpenVMS line editor. Would use a fullscreen text editor on my Windows computer and would send the .txt file across the network with the terminal emulator to the VMS platform.
 

Thread Starter

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
1,461
My first editor was

"take out the offending punch card and replace it"

No one has mentioned Emacs

Has it gone now days ?
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,169
The one I use and like is Programmers file editor. It is old and not been updated since 1999 but its still works with windows 7.
It seems to work with windows 10 but I have not used windows 10 much. If you just Google "Programmers file editor" you will find links to download it. It does not need to be installed. You just run the .exe file so you can run it from removable storage.

Les.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
3,306
I have found that the IDE editors are way better than a general purpose editor. I am perfectly happy with MPLAB (netbeans) for Microchip C and eclipse for Java.

I am working on my own language and I use Visual Studio because it allows me to create and manage projects and build using a make file. No syntax awareness, though

I use emacs for general editing.

Bob
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
17,152
For what it's worth, there's an excellent and free text and code editor for iOS called Kodex. I avoid coding on the phone, but it's a handy tool.
 
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