One momentary push button and 4 basic relay to turn on and off a light bulb.

Thread Starter

Protellor

Joined Mar 13, 2023
5
Hey dear everyone!

I am trying to create a circuit that turns on and off.
I want to do it with four Omron G2R-1-SN(S) AC 230V Relays and an industrial momentary push button (ELMARK EL2-BW07)
I saw a DC circuit online that does this latching and dis-latching to turn on and off an LED but it certainly will not work with an AC circuit.
The goal is to get the momentary push button latch on the circuit and turn on the bulb and then dis-latch the circuit therefore turning off the bulb.
Can you help me how to create this circuit? A wiring diagram can be also helpful or just a description of all the connections.
Thank you!
Gergely
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,835
I saw a DC circuit online that does this latching and dis-latching to turn on and off an LED but it certainly will not work with an AC circuit.
If you want a latching circuit with one PB then I think you will have to go with a relay with a DC coil and some circuitry.
The DC can be provided by a wall wort supply.
 
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Thread Starter

Protellor

Joined Mar 13, 2023
5
Thank you guys, but the point of this is to create a circuitry with the listed components. An electric circuit is what is looked for! But what kind of electric circuit would do the magic? I know It is possible somehow to do it with the components listed. I designed an aesthetic structure which houses all thees components and not other ones. I do believe that there must be a way to do this circuit with just thees four Omron 230V AC relays and that pushbutton. If Anyone has any idea how to achieve this goal with thees components... Gosh that would be great..!
 

Thread Starter

Protellor

Joined Mar 13, 2023
5
What makes You "believe" that this can be accomplished with no other components ?
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I believe that this can be accomplished with thees components as well. I did not mean that this can not be accomplished with other components... Jesus. How would one be this dumb you suggest?! Crazy.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
4,290
"" I believe that this can be accomplished with thees components as well. ""
.
The question is .......
What makes You "believe"
that this can be accomplished with just Relays, and no other components ?
Does this mean that You "want" it to be possible ?
.
.
.
 

Thread Starter

Protellor

Joined Mar 13, 2023
5
"" I believe that this can be accomplished with thees components as well. ""
.
The question is .......
What makes You "believe"
that this can be accomplished with just Relays, and no other components ?
Does this mean that You "want" it to be possible ?
.
.
.
So, my apologies.. Let me clear the misunderstanding. I want to create this circuit with thees components. If I have to use other added components to thees ones it is ok. But I would like to use thees to begin with and add others if necessary. Clear?
 

Thread Starter

Protellor

Joined Mar 13, 2023
5
"" I believe that this can be accomplished with thees components as well. ""
.
The question is .......
What makes You "believe"
that this can be accomplished with just Relays, and no other components ?
Does this mean that You "want" it to be possible ?
.
.
.
Thees components in the first place and if necessary other ones added to thees. Is it clear now?
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
4,290
For an AC Circuit,
a DC-Power-Supply will have to be added to make a "One-Button" Switch work.

The only Relay needed would be one to do the actual switching of the AC-Power,
everything else would be low-Voltage-DC, ( 12-Volts DC would be a convenient Voltage ).
It would be best if the Relay had a 12-Volt-DC Coil,
but it could still be done with a 120-Volt-AC Coil.

To make the Circuit even cleaner,
a Solid-State-Relay would be my choice,
with no Mechanical-Relays at all.

There would be no problem at all if there were 2 Push-Button-Switches instead of 1.

For any simple Single Push-Button Circuit,
a Capacitor must be charged, and discharged, with a DC-Voltage.

Or You can purchase a mechanical Flip-Flop-Latching-Relay,
Or You can purchase an "Alternating-Action-Push-Button", ( Push-On / Push-Off, Push-Button ).

These are your choices,
how much Money do You want to spend ?
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.
.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
9,264
Hey dear everyone!

I am trying to create a circuit that turns on and off.
I want to do it with four Omron G2R-1-SN(S) AC 230V Relays and an industrial momentary push button (ELMARK EL2-BW07)
The Omron G2R-[]-S (S) series relays are available with DC coils so you could replace your AC relays with DC version with identical dimensions.

A buck converter module like this one would be easy to embed to provide the DC power.
 

sghioto

Joined Dec 31, 2017
5,427
Here's my proposal using all four of the G2R- 1-SN(S) relays
According to the specs the relays will activate at 80% supply and hold at 30%, so I think I have the resistor values correct.
1680049848665.png
 
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AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
11,196
In your first post you mention four relays but only one switch. Please restate your question more clearly.

For example, do you want each relay to come on sequentially as you press the button four times?

Do all four relays come on at the same time?

Are you saying that you need to use four relays, or that you have four relays available but a working circuit can use fewer?

Is this a homework/school work problem?

ak
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,835
For your amusement, here's a single PB alternate action latch, using two relays, two diodes, and one MOSFET:

1678909546511.png
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
19,394
I did exactly what the TS is asking for, using two relays. That was back in 1957 and my only recollection was that the turn-on required a very quick hit on the button while the turn off did not. It used the relay response time and I will need to do some thinking as to how it worked. So while I did achieve it, the result was not very convenient.
Probably one relay was in a latching circuit and the other was the unlatch and the whole thing depended on the relay's response time.
 
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