Need Help - My UPS is cut the power

Thread Starter

bileguru

Joined Jun 29, 2021
1
Hello All,

Here is the situation I am facing with my UPS recently. The issue is I am using UPS for my desktop, sometime it starts continuously beeping and PC will shutdown automatically which is very random. If power goes normally UPS will take load and PC will not shutdown. I changed my old UPS two days back because I was thinking my old UPS was the issue. Anyone can help me to understand what is happening here?

Thanks
 

sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
512
Your line voltage may be low (or too high), and causing the UPS to trigger. It could also happen when there is electrical noise on the powerline, causing dips in the standard voltage which in turn trips the UPS to run.
Also, some UPS will trigger when the line frequency varies too much from the "normal", whether it be 60Hz or 50Hz.
All depends on the UPS design. Some UPS have means of setting the sensitivity to voltage changes, check if yours does.
I would check your line voltage to see where it is, and check it at various times of the day. It will likely fluctuate during the day. Most home type of UPS do not regulate the power line voltage, they only trigger when conditions go outside the "normal" ranges. Some high end (commercial) UPS will do both, condition the power and control the voltage.
 

ttocsmij

Joined May 30, 2018
9
Hello All,

Here is the situation I am facing with my UPS recently. The issue is I am using UPS for my desktop, sometime it starts continuously beeping and PC will shutdown automatically which is very random. If power goes normally UPS will take load and PC will not shutdown. I changed my old UPS two days back because I was thinking my old UPS was the issue. Anyone can help me to understand what is happening here?

Thanks
1. Sounds like the UPS is going it's job: jumping in when line power fails in some way (high, low, dies, etc.).

2. The PC shutdown is likely a normal response from the UPS software sensing the UPS is about to exhaust the batteries so it shuts down the computer.

3. If #2 is happening within minutes of a power failure, the UPS is not sized properly. Add up the wattages of all devices connected to the UPS in question, multiply by 2, and use the UPS manufacturer's web site or support staff to find a UPS that will support that wattage load for at least an hour. At least that is the time frame I like to use. Most power failures at my location are typically restored within 30 minutes. If your outages tend to last longer, increase the time the UPS needs to support.

ALSO, make sure any UPS you buy is outputting a pure sine wave, not a simulated digital output. This is especially important when connected devices include computers, power bricks, USB chargers, digital displays, printers, modems, routers and any other digital device. For example, my desktop, LED display, cable modem, and wireless router, are all on UPS's. When the line power goes away I just keep surfin' away.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
3,617
Also look at what is plugged into the UPS. Some have multiple outlets. One set of outlets is filtered power and another set is UPS power. ONLY plug in essential ride-through hardware to the UPS outlets. Computer and monitor are primary, then networking/phone if required. Lights, printers, stereo, etc. are not essential and should be plugged into filtered only outlets. Check your manual for audible alarm status. Most give a slow beep to alert that UPS is active and fast beep to alert that UPS shutdown is imminent and files should be saved, and computer should be properly shutdown before UPS fails. UPS lead-acid batteries do not last forever and must be replaced every 2-5 years depending on battery quality.
 
Last edited:
Top