Identifying an SMD component on an MZ-JPV128R/0A2 128G SSD blade

Thread Starter

solarmon

Joined Feb 21, 2019
8
Hi,

I have an MZ-JPV128R/0A2 128G SSD blade (from an Apple Macbook Air 13") that has had a component knocked off it and I am trying to:

1. Identify it, and possibly the value (specification) of it.
2. Determine how easy it is to repair, if possible/feasible.

From the pictures you can see that is a black and shiny component (like the one next to where it was), but with no markings that can be seen. The most distinguishing feature of the component are the two contacts pads underneath it, with 1 pad seemingly larger than the other.

With my limited soldering skill, and no SMD repair/reflow equipment, I suspect that this is a lost cause, but I'd like to identify it anyways.

Thanks in advance for any help that can be provided.
 

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pmd34

Joined Feb 22, 2014
527
Hi solarmon, a tricky one... I guess it could be a diode, tantalum(?) capacitor or maaaybe an inductor.
You could see if you could find the datasheet for large IC that it is next to and see if there is a "typical application" which may show some standard components its used with.

You could try and identify the package type, then see if you can find similar to see if it is a capacitor or diode then see if you can match the marking numbers to the component still on the board.

As it is a memory device that is switching at high speed, it could just be a power supply decoupling / smoothing capacitor, so maaaay actually run without it.

You could try and trace where the pads for the device go to, see if one goes to the ground plane, and the other to something that is used alot on the circuit board, and could be the positive supply. (Which would tell you if it was a decoupling capacitor)

For soldering if, there is enough pad protruding from the sides of the device to get a soldering iron tip on then you should be OK with an iron, and some flux, solder paste, or thin solder (with silver is best if you have it). The easiest would be to use a hot air too however.
 

Thread Starter

solarmon

Joined Feb 21, 2019
8
Hi pmd34,

Thanks for your suggestions/tips.

The controller chip is a Samsung UBX (S4LN058A01-8030), but I cannot find any schematics or design diagrams that could help.

The best I could find is this image that seems to show the component (see top left) with some markings - but I'm not familiar with SMD components and markings:

https://am.zdmimg.com/201610/02/57f0b27123b7a.jpg_e600.jpg

Looking at the components again, zoomed in through my phone camera, at differrent angles and with flash on, they do seem to have markings like that.

I assume the line markings is just to identify the polarity of it, but I don't know what seems to be a 'J' next to it.
 

Thread Starter

solarmon

Joined Feb 21, 2019
8
I did try to put the capacitor back on, but because one of the leg tabs had broken off, I couldn't get any solder on to it to make contact.

If I knew what value to the component was, I could at least buy a replacement. Or, maybe find a faulty donor board with the component on it and take it from that.
 

Thread Starter

solarmon

Joined Feb 21, 2019
8
Looks like the link has stopped working - I've found the picture again, saved it and is now attached.

What would I be looking for with the continuity test? I just did a quick one, and the pad nearest to the other similar component looks to be going to ground - is it is showing continuity with quite a few of the SSD 12+16 connector pins, and other components.
 

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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,819
Looks like an electrolytic capacitor to me, 10μF 6.3V would be my guess.

Use the resistance test range on a DMM and check for resistance. If it is a resistor you ought to get a steady resistance measurement. If it is a capacitor, the reading should climb steadily until the meter goes out of range.
 

Thread Starter

solarmon

Joined Feb 21, 2019
8
Looks like an electrolytic capacitor to me, 10μF 6.3V would be my guess.

Use the resistance test range on a DMM and check for resistance. If it is a resistor you ought to get a steady resistance measurement. If it is a capacitor, the reading should climb steadily until the meter goes out of range.
Thanks Mr Chips

I seem to have misplaced the component now, but since the tab broke off I don't I would have been able to measure it anyways.

I'll order 10μF 6.3V tantalum cap and see what happens.

Cheers!
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,819
Thanks Mr Chips

I seem to have misplaced the component now, but since the tab broke off I don't I would have been able to measure it anyways.

I'll order 10μF 6.3V tantalum cap and see what happens.

Cheers!
The voltage rating is not critical and 16V would be fine also. I made the mistake of thinking that this is a USB powered memory stick.
 

Thread Starter

solarmon

Joined Feb 21, 2019
8
So, I got a 10µF, 6.3V, 20% / Tantalum cap (F920J106MPA) and managed to solder it on as best as I can - not pretty, but I think it did the job.

However, it is still not recognised by the Macbook Air. :(

Using the multimeter, I see that the cap is getting 3.3v, on its positive side, and is connected to ground on its negative side.

So, either the cap value is wrong, or somewhere else on the SSD is faulty.

Any other advice appreciated!
 
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