How Can I submit a novel patentable design idea to a company?

Thread Starter

Emad2017

Joined Dec 6, 2017
7
Hi there,

Recently, I have designed a new charge amplifier than can be used to implement a precision and low-cost interface for piezoelectric sensors.
I have published an article about the novel proposed circuit in IEEE Sensors Journal. ( A brief information about the new proposed circuit has been included at the end of post)
According to the best of my knowledge, after publication, I have about 1 year to apply for patent.

Now I am looking for a company which interested to buy patentable designs. By searching internet, I found many advice about the methods of submitting new idea to a company. However, unfortunately, I found most of them useless.
Therefore any guidance, suggestion, cooperation offer that can help me are greatly appreciated.

*Any intersted person who wants to collaborate with me can send an email for me through the following email address:

<SNIP>

Thank you in advance
Emad

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[ Brief information about the new circuit ]

The proposed circuit shows it's advantages in the quasi static applications when the low-cutoff frequency of amplifier is smaller than 1Hz. In these applications the conventional charge amplifier usually uses extremely large resistor (in the range of several Giga-Ohm) and electrometer OpAmps. In some application in order to reduce the price of circuit instead of using an extremely large resistor a resistive T-networks is used. However the resistive T-network increases the noise and output dc offset voltage and it's thermal drift significantly.
However the new proposed circuit doesn't need such extremely large resistor at all and instead of using electrometer OpAmp
It can implemented by general JFET OpAmp. The proposed circuit reduce the output DC offset and thermal drift of it (due to thermal drift of input bias current) dramatically without violating noise performance of the circuit. As it has been shown in the article, the proposed circuit surpass the conventional charge amplifier and another patented scheme which was patented by BAE systems (the BAE circuit also uses extremely large resistor like conventional charge amplifier). The proposed charge amplifier has simple structure and it can be implemented by general purpose OpAmp and with
discerete components.

Moderators note : removed email to avoid spam
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
You may be mistaken about having a year to file. What if someone else files tomorrow? You’d have to challenge them legally and that means dollars. You can file a provisional patent to buy yourself more time - perhaps that’s what you meant.

Most big companies will actively avoid ideas coming in from the outside as a matter of policy. If I take a phone call from you, I am now open to a potential lawsuit by you in the future, claiming I stole your idea from what I learned in the phone call.

Personal network contacts within your target industry are very valuable in getting someone to listen. Having some reputation might lure a company to invoke an NDA to enable discussion. It’s not going to happen with a random person.

Using university contacts might be a way to get your word out.

Selling ideas is a tough business model. Even good ideas are dime a dozen. Implementation is more impressive.
 

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,432
I have about 1 year to apply for patent.
In the US, the first one to file for a patent gets it. Not the first to invent (or even publish).

Having published your invention in IEEE may prevent someone else from having a patent granted (through the examination process), but if they can show evidence of having had the idea prior to your publication, they might still be able to get a grant.

If you think your idea is valuable, and you are willing to spend your money attaining the patent and defending it, you should right this minute file a provisional patent. This gives you a 6 month grace period to file the actual patent application.

I am not a lawyer -- but I play one on AAC. Your mileage may vary.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
14,464
Hi there,

Recently, I have designed a new charge amplifier than can be used to implement a precision and low-cost interface for piezoelectric sensors.
I have published an article about the novel proposed circuit in IEEE Sensors Journal. ( A brief information about the new proposed circuit has been included at the end of post)
According to the best of my knowledge, after publication, I have about 1 year to apply for patent.

Now I am looking for a company which interested to buy patentable designs. By searching internet, I found many advice about the methods of submitting new idea to a company. However, unfortunately, I found most of them useless.
Therefore any guidance, suggestion, cooperation offer that can help me are greatly appreciated.

*Any intersted person who wants to collaborate with me can send an email for me through the following email address:

<SNIP>

Thank you in advance
Emad

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[ Brief information about the new circuit ]

The proposed circuit shows it's advantages in the quasi static applications when the low-cutoff frequency of amplifier is smaller than 1Hz. In these applications the conventional charge amplifier usually uses extremely large resistor (in the range of several Giga-Ohm) and electrometer OpAmps. In some application in order to reduce the price of circuit instead of using an extremely large resistor a resistive T-networks is used. However the resistive T-network increases the noise and output dc offset voltage and it's thermal drift significantly.
However the new proposed circuit doesn't need such extremely large resistor at all and instead of using electrometer OpAmp
It can implemented by general JFET OpAmp. The proposed circuit reduce the output DC offset and thermal drift of it (due to thermal drift of input bias current) dramatically without violating noise performance of the circuit. As it has been shown in the article, the proposed circuit surpass the conventional charge amplifier and another patented scheme which was patented by BAE systems (the BAE circuit also uses extremely large resistor like conventional charge amplifier). The proposed charge amplifier has simple structure and it can be implemented by general purpose OpAmp and with
discerete components.

Moderators note : removed email to avoid spam
You cannot practically do this. There is no company on the face of this planet that wants to have ANYTHING to do with an independent "inventor". There are sound economic reasons for this, so don't even waste your time. The ONLY way to monetize an invention is to start an enterprise to make and market a product. If you do this you have to be able to shut it down when the copycats show up. There is one other way, but it is very counter intuitive.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,604
In the past you had to present a working model to the Patent Office, now you can simply patent an idea. If someone actually uses that idea (or even comes close to it), you sue them for patent infringement and royalties! There is a new case involving the processing by automated testing of body fluids for the chinese death flu. The patents were obtained during the bankruptcy of the startup company that filed and obtained the patents describing the process without ever actually doing it.
 

Sensacell

Joined Jun 19, 2012
2,598
As a word of caution, patents are usually a waste of money and you would be financially better off by just putting your money in a 5 year CD. I've known individuals who've taken out a patent and they wound up losing every dime.

I wholeheartedly agree.

As a consulting engineer, I have watched many of my clients shovel money into the patent pit- all, (100%) - have seen ZERO monetary return for this effort.
The US patent system is broken, the 19th-century inventor myth lives on, while only lawyers and large corporations profit.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
6,594
If I were in your shoes and wanted to offer my invention around to see if there are any takers, I would, as joeyd999 suggests in post #3, first file a provisional patent application. It is inexpensive -I think U.S. $130 for a small entity (an individual) and it doesn't have to be very formal and does not need claims but does need to describe the invention thoroughly. You can do it yourself over the internet.

The provisional patent application establishes your priority date, it is not examined unless there is an interference proceeding and it can also be useful as an invention disclosure with which to explain the invention to your attorney when the time comes to file a provisional patent application.

As for the 1 year I think that is 1 year after publishing or public demonstration. If you file a provisional application but do not file a utility patent application within one year of filing the provisional application you lose the right to patent it.

All you really need to know: https://www.uspto.gov/patent
 
Last edited:

joeyd999

Joined Jun 6, 2011
4,432
I've known individuals who've taken out a patent and they wound up losing every dime.
And I personally have written and been granted 7 patents (not up there with Edison...yet), and I have made (lots of) money off my patents.

I am pro-patent, but anti-stupid-patent (which a majority of patent grants are, IMHO).
 

Thread Starter

Emad2017

Joined Dec 6, 2017
7
If I were in your shoes and wanted to offer my invention around to see if there are any takers, I would, as joeyd999 suggests in post #3, first file a provisional patent application. It is inexpensive -I think U.S. $130 for a small entity (an individual) and it doesn't have to be very formal and does not need claims but does need to describe the invention thoroughly. You can do it yourself over the internet.

The provisional patent application establishes your priority date, it is not examined unless there is an interference proceeding and it can also be useful as an invention disclosure with which to explain the invention to your attorney when the time comes to file a provisional patent application.

As for the 1 year I think that is 1 year after publishing or public demonstration. If you file a provisional application but do not file a utility patent application within one year of filing the provisional application you lose the right to patent it.

All you really need to know: https://www.uspto.gov/patent
Thank you for your advice
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
2,547
In the US, the first one to file for a patent gets it. Not the first to invent (or even publish).
Not the way I understand it. Anything published is not patentable, with the exception of the person(s) who published it, and, as the OP stated it the have a year to apply.

This understanding comes from my experience at Intel where I was an inventor on 3 patents.

Bob
Bob
 
Last edited:

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
Not the way I understand it. Anything published is not patentable, with the exception of the person(s) who published it, and, as the OP stated it the have a year to apply.

This understanding comes from my experience at Intel where I was an inventor on 3 patents.

Bob
Bob
Depends on where you want patents. I would imagine Intel wasn't interested in having merely U.S. patents.

Useful:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_to_file_and_first_to_invent
 

Thread Starter

Emad2017

Joined Dec 6, 2017
7
Thank you all,
But the main question
"How Can I submit a novel patentable design idea to a company?" remained unanswered.
maybe it is an impossible mission and I should ask "Tom Cruise"!!!:cool:
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
14,464
I answered the question in Post #4, but maybe you were too busy ignoring good advice.

Read the following for more details:

https://www.tinaja.com/glib/casagpat.pdf

The best quite from this article by noted author and technologist, Don Lancaster:

"At one time, way back in the golden age of inventing, ideas were worth as much as a dime a dozen.
These days, they are worth less than a dime a bale in ten bale lots.


I repeat -- there is no practical way to do what you want to do. You need to stop acting like an inventor, and start acting like a businessman - period, full stop.
 

Thread Starter

Emad2017

Joined Dec 6, 2017
7
I answered the question in Post #4, but maybe you were too busy ignoring good advice.

Read the following for more details:

https://www.tinaja.com/glib/casagpat.pdf

The best quite from this article by noted author and technologist, Don Lancaster:

"At one time, way back in the golden age of inventing, ideas were worth as much as a dime a dozen.
These days, they are worth less than a dime a bale in ten bale lots.


I repeat -- there is no practical way to do what you want to do. You need to stop acting like an inventor, and start acting like a businessman - period, full stop.
Thank you papabravo
Thank you for sharing this excelent article.
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
1,209
Contact a Patent Attorney. Don't cost yourself by posting information here or anywhere before you do. Doing so may have already cost you because information is now in the 'public domain'.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
14,464
Contact a Patent Attorney. Don't cost yourself by posting information here or anywhere before you do. Doing so may have already cost you because information is now in the 'public domain'.
The point of Lancaster's article is that ideas should be in the public domain to establish your reputation as an expert and to forestall others from being able to patent them. You make your money as an expert consultant with -- not a single idea, but hundreds or thousands of ideas. People will pay big bucks for a continuous stream of ideas.
 
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