DIP sockets vs SIP strips?

Thread Starter

metermannd

Joined Oct 25, 2020
93
I'm getting close to pulling the trigger on ordering PCB etc. for a project, and I'm looking at about a dozen DIP sockets on the board.

The small 7-segment displays I'm looking at have pretty spendy sockets (if I spec'd out right, >$5 each!!), so I was looking at getting something like a 40-pin SIP strip for $2 and change, then cutting them down into a series of strips I can just stuff and solder.

Would there be any downside if I just used SIP strip everywhere instead of getting proper sockets? (when it comes to installing, I would stick a random part that fits to 'gauge' the strips in vertically long enough to tack-solder etc.)
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,935
Only difference might be the height off of the board... Might want to check that. As long as the pin to pin is the same.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,271
Use a jig to keep the strips positioned correctly. Solder one pin and check alignment before soldering the rest.

You can reduce height if you make the holes large enough for the shoulders. You can save even more height if you use individual machined pins. Some will come with metal holders. I have hundreds on pins on 24 pin wide DIP carriers.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,989
I was going to suggest machined pins on a carrier like this:
1606283743206.png
I have found their contacts to be very reliable, but they may be too expensive. In terms of an alignment jig for SIP strips, I would use a carrier like that, an appropriate machined pin socket, or scrap/spare IC with correct spacing.
 

Thread Starter

metermannd

Joined Oct 25, 2020
93
I plan to use spare IC(s) for spacing while tack-soldering the strips into place before soldering all the pins.
Looks like I will do that then. If this wasn't a one-off, then I would be using sockets. Thanks all!
 

Delta prime

Joined Nov 15, 2019
628
Hello there
:)
If you don't mind me asking why can't you just solder the component directly to the PCB but I use them pins and sockets all the time as well. Just curious?
 

Thread Starter

metermannd

Joined Oct 25, 2020
93
Har har. I'm actually better with PTH stuff than SMT.
Most of the sockets will be for 7-segment displays, two are intended for the I/O data cable, and one IC (8279 kbd / display decoder) is scarce enough I don't want to spoil it by soldering it into the circuit.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,989
No question in my mind about a difficult to source component. As for I/O cables, I usually put the male component on the board. About the only plug-ins I use today are modules, e.g., break out boards that are usually fitted with male pins.

As for the female component, I try to avoid the simple, 2-prong fork type. I use something with more spring and rated for more insertion cycles when possible.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,935
The machined pins are fairly easily separated from the plastic header material. Then using another piece of header material to hold them in alignment when soldering can be soldered to the PCB without the plastic header. BUT you lose the insulation of the plastic. I often use another piece of header on top of the one being soldered to brace and keep it in alignment if there is another point that it can be plugged into.
 
Last edited:

ElectricSpidey

Joined Dec 2, 2017
1,404
To properly align sip sockets I normally take 2 male headers with the same or more pins, place them in a small breadboard, place the sips onto the headers, invert, place in PC board and after checking the alignment I solder, and yea It is best to do one, then one on the other end, because the heat can cause the sip to move.

Now this probably wont work on precision sockets, but I don't use them because they can be a real pain to place the chip.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
7,775
A word of caution is that some DIP sockets have the metal part not held in place very well at all, and so they may fall apart while handling them. Not all sockets are equal, is my point.
 

Thread Starter

metermannd

Joined Oct 25, 2020
93
I didn't say I considered the Scanbe sockets to be quality... ;)

(speaking from past repair experience, and I know another tech that despises them to the point of replacing them on sight)

I'll take a good milled-pin or wipe-contact socket over a Scanbe socket any day.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,989
I haven't used then either. Misunderstood your comment. I use Mill-Max or similar. For individual contacts (e.g. in-line connectors), I like Berg type. I have some Samtec Tigereye, but have not used them. Also AMP female, but I don't have the part number handy.
 
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