Wire wrap intro..........

Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
Hello,

I want to use wire wrap method for my projects as I find that breadboard isn't reliable (my z80 noop doesn't work if my power adapter isn't on the same breadboard as z80- you can imagine!!)

Please I need to know what I need to start using wire wrap and how to get them on ali express. I know I need the wrapping wire, a tool but is the board perfboard?..I can't find wire wrap sockets on ali express

Please assist. Thanks
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
25,664
What type of "breadboard" are you referring to, that's unreliable?

Wirewrap is an obsolete process that no one uses, which is why you have a problem finding sockets.
 
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Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
the 830 point solderless board.. Oh, so what can I use?

Using perfboard, I only need perfboard and wires right?
 

Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
Hi, thanks..I do not want to solder though. I want to make connections with wires. The board I need for this is Perfboard?
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
Hi, thanks..I do not want to solder though. I want to make connections with wires. The board I need for this is Perfboard?

There are regular wire wrap boards with pins and sockets already installed. I like those the best as wires and components are all on the same side of the board. You would have "carriers" for chip components. You still had to solder resistors, capacitors etc to the "carrier". Good luck with finding them though. Wire wrap is an art that died at least 35 years ago.

They also make wire wrap sockets. They have extra long pins. You shove them through a conventional perf board.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/IC-Socket-...-3/143089580200?hash=item2150cdb8a8:rk:5:pf:0

You would still need to find the carriers for the discrete components. Doubt you will get away with wrapping to a resistor lead. I have never tried it.

Wire wrap is a PITA. About the only good thing about it is that you can easily disconnect components for trouble shooting.
 
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Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
please you read books before building such yh?
Please what books if you remember? I want to do these things.
I know you mentioned tv typewriter before

Thanks
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
8,048
.I do not want to solder though.
Is there a reason for this? If it is because you think you can't do it or aren't good at it, it is a learned skill. And if wanting to do things with electronics, the earlier you learn the better. Like many things in life, practice makes perfect.
 

Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
oh no..I don't want to make it permanent just yet
Yeah soldering is a skill, noticed I got good at it after practicing alot but haven't done any in weeks
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
21,630
Yeah soldering is a skill, noticed I got good at it after practicing alot but haven't done any in weeks
You never forget it.
It's like riding a bike! ;):p

Use Vero (strip board) board, cuts down on the amount of conductors.
The only reason I keep a spool of WW is for small hook-ups or (soldered) jumpers.
Max.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
1,936
I too find the breadboard not reliable for anything that requires reliable communication (SPI, I2C, etc..). In my personal experience, if I need it to be reliable and it has non-DC such as a clock or bus, I bite the bullet and solder. Using a board that already has rows and columns connected makes the job somewhat less tedious, like this:

https://www.kr4.us/830-pts-solder-in-breadboard-exact-solderless-match.html
 

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,835
please you read books before building such yh?
Please what books if you remember? I want to do these things.
I know you mentioned tv typewriter before

Thanks

You might be referring to the TV Typewriter Cookbook by Lancaster. I have one sitting on my shelf. Can't help with the Z80 but the 6502 Applications book by Rodeny Zaks is lso good. He also has one called Microprocessors from Chips to Systems.
 
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Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
You might be referring to the TV Typewriter Cookbook by on Lancaster. I have one sitting on my shelf. Can't help with the Z80 but the 6502 Applications book by Rodeny Zaks is lso good. He also has one called Microprocessors from Chips to Systems.
It can't help? Please what can help
 

OBW0549

Joined Mar 2, 2015
3,566
I sometimes use wire wrap for prototyping. I get my supplies from Digi-Key (I don't know anything about Ali Express):


please you read books before building such yh?
Please what books if you remember? I want to do these things.
I don't think there's enough to say about wire wrap to fill a book; it's pretty easy. The article @KeepItSimpleStupid linked to in post #11 gives good information.

Wire wrap can be used for both analog and digital circuits (and mixed analog/digital), provided you follow a few simple rules:
  • Never, NEVER bundle wires together; avoid the urge to be "tidy" and just go point-to-point.
  • Keep sensitive analog circuits as far away from digital circuits as possible.
  • Route digital signals and all other high-level signals well away from sensitive analog circuits.
  • Identify sensitive analog circuit nodes and arrange components so those nodes are as compact as possible.
  • Use a decoupling capacitor on EVERY supply pin of EVERY chip-- no exceptions, EVER.
  • If at all possible, construct the circuit on a board with a solid ground plane.
  • If a ground plane is not available, construct a ground grid with heavy wire (AWG #18 or larger).
  • Provide separate ground and supply current paths for high current or high dI/dT signals.
 

Thread Starter

dmowziz

Joined Jan 18, 2019
76
I sometimes use wire wrap for prototyping. I get my supplies from Digi-Key (I don't know anything about Ali Express):



I don't think there's enough to say about wire wrap to fill a book; it's pretty easy. The article @KeepItSimpleStupid linked to in post #11 gives good information.

Wire wrap can be used for both analog and digital circuits (and mixed analog/digital), provided you follow a few simple rules:
  • Never, NEVER bundle wires together; avoid the urge to be "tidy" and just go point-to-point.
  • Keep sensitive analog circuits as far away from digital circuits as possible.
  • Route digital signals and all other high-level signals well away from sensitive analog circuits.
  • Identify sensitive analog circuit nodes and arrange components so those nodes are as compact as possible.
  • Use a decoupling capacitor on EVERY supply pin of EVERY chip-- no exceptions, EVER.
  • If at all possible, construct the circuit on a board with a solid ground plane.
  • If a ground plane is not available, construct a ground grid with heavy wire (AWG #18 or larger).
  • Provide separate ground and supply current paths for high current or high dI/dT signals.
Hi thanks for this..What do you mean by point-to-point

btw, I meant books for z80 but thanks for rules
 

OBW0549

Joined Mar 2, 2015
3,566
What do you mean by point-to-point
It means exactly what it says. If you need to make a wire connection between two points on a board (e.g., a pin on one IC to a pin on another IC), run the wire directly between them so as to keep it as short as possible. Even though the resulting board may look messy (see post #7), doing this also minimizes the capacitance between wires, and thus the crosstalk between signals.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
22,099
When you are wiring multiple buses such as encountered in microcontroller experimentation, breadboarding becomes painful.

There are three options (almost all obsolete) that I have used successfully in the past.

1) wire-wrapping, if you can locate wire-wrap DIP sockets

2) Scotch-3M IDC breadboarding system (I have to look up the correct terminology) - which is probably impossible to source. This, by far, is the most efficient breadboarding technique. You simple run wire-wrap wire to each connection point and press it in. It allows you to lay continuous runs of a signal wire.

3) Using special wire insulated with a thermo-plastic coating. You simply wire from point-to-point using your soldering iron. The heat from the soldering iron melts the plastic coating and solders the end of the wire to the solder pad. As above, you can lay continuous runs of one signal without having to cut the wire.
 
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