Is Radio Shack "wire wrap" wire the same as Kynar?

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,412
Kynar is a trade name for PVDF plastic used for jacketing wire. It may not be Kynar but still usable for wire wrap.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,095
The Radio Shack wire wrap I have is "Kynar" . That is, it acts like Kynar insulation, is high temperature, feels silky, and doesn't melt back like PVC does. I used it for hookup on perf boards but switched to 24 awg with Kynar insulation as it was easier for me to handle.

I got my 24 awg Kynar from Mouser. At the time, it was the cheapest distributor.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,095
Here's my wiring with the small (30 awg) stuff (left) and the bigger stuff (right). Those are different projects.

1596885217927.png1596885440770.png

Both sizes of wire work, but I like the way the bigger stuff looks and holds its shape. The bigger stuff can also be stripped easily with ordinary strippers. The 30-gauge stuff was stripped by melting one side with my soldering iron, peeling the insulation back, and cutting it off. Works, but I don't like to abuse my soldering iron tips like that. You can also shave a side off with a blade and peel back, etc. Still more complicated than using a stripper.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,095
If you have trouble strippng it, please come back to this thread. I have some recommendations. It is more slippery than PVC insulated wire.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,412
30/32 Ga was used for 5V digital mostly. 22/24 Ga used for 5-9V analog mostly. Bigger wire is easier to work with. I still have some wire and wire tools but haven't seen any perfboard stakes in a while. For plated perfboard, long header pins will do for stakes once soldered onto the board.
 

Thread Starter

upand_at_them

Joined May 15, 2010
474
For the wire-wrap wire that I mentioned above I use the little "forked blade" type stripper that came with the wire-wrapping tool. It generally works well, but sometimes it nicks the wire and breaks it. I have decent Craftsman (made in USA) wire strippers that will go down to 24 and 26 gauge, so I'm guessing those will work with the wire you mentioned. I may look for strippers for the 26-30 gauge, though, for the few times that I do use the wire-wrap wire (already started on MMcLaren's PIC clock) as that stripper tool is also very small.IMAG1172.jpg
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,412
I have used these since forever. Come in 2 sizes, 10-18AWG & 16-26AWG. I like em because they are spring-loaded and have a good wire cutter built-in. Good hard steel blades. A slight twist of the wrist and they will cut smaller size wire than the gauge says it is for. So I can strip 22AWG PVC/Silicone rubber with the one for larger sizes. Many different manufacturers of this style. Won't work for the 30/32 AWG stuff. You will either lose them or die before you wear them out.
1596898652541.png
 

Thread Starter

upand_at_them

Joined May 15, 2010
474
Yeah, my Craftsman ones look a lot like that. Quality tool. Good down to 26 AWG. No 28 or 30 AWG though, and like jpanhalt I don't like to use my soldering iron to burn the insulation off.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,095
@SamR

Years ago, I watched a repair tech do some wire-wrap wiring of digital circuits. He made it look easy and his result was art. I am not that.

My Jonard JIG-2030 is bigger than your Klein. :)

1596899624152.png

I did add one layer of Kapton tape to one end to stop any nicking. You may have to go up a size, i.e., #22 for #24, or down a size.

Of course, breadboards are usually 0.1" on center, so a machinist's rule is handy. I mark the wire (fine tip Sharpie) and cut a piece a little longer than necessary. I use a pair of $1 made-in-Pakistan smooth jaw "hemostats." Grip one end with the hemostat (don't click it), put it in the proper slot, twist about 180° to 360°, then pull. Insulation comes off cleanly with no nicks. Repeat for other end. For really short pieces, I go the entire 360°. Even then, I sometimes need to replace the insulation on the wire.

A good Craftsman is probably the same.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,412
Yup don't forget to twist when cutting the insulation. My larger pair are Ideal brand that we carried in stores inventory at the plant and used around my office making cables and such. My smaller pair are chinesium (not as sharp) but do go down to 20-30AWG.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
21,666
I use 30AWG wire-wrap wire most of the time and have no problems working with it.
I use this OK WSU-30 M tool for stripping.

1596901304264.png
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
2,412
A little pricey, but they work perfectly on small wire
Never saw those before but look just the thing for making breadboard jumpers or stripping cable ends for a D-shell termination. I have a big pair of expensive ratcheting adjustable strippers that don't work for crap. Complete waste of money. Just takes up room in my toolbox because too expensive to throw out.
 
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