Which are the Best Hardware Electronics Companies that recruit people quickly

Discussion in 'Career Advising' started by Electronic_Maniac, Jan 4, 2018.

  1. Electronic_Maniac

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 26, 2017
    69
    0
    Hi,

    What are the best electronics companies that offer good package and responds immediately to the resume?

    And How to approach those companies for an interview?

    I am based in India having 1.5 years of Electronics Hardware experience.

    Sending resume's to the company's email isn't helping
     
  2. Gibson486

    Active Member

    Jul 20, 2012
    274
    17
    The best ones are the ones that will hire you. Seriously. Your question is really far fetched, but it very common among newer grads.

    Unless you are some hot shot from some IVY league or MIT or you demonstrated that you are above everyone else, you really do not get to choose when you do not have lots of experience. So, asking for a "good package" is not really the thing to do. You go to whoever is willing to take a chance on you. Remember, beggers cannot be choosers, but you can only choose if you have something to offer that is hard to come by.
     
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  3. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
    6,977
    1,611
    I don't know how it's done in your neck of the woods (which you don't include in your profile), but here, companies who are interested in graduates from your school send recruiters to screen people before they graduate.

    It's also common practice for students to do internships at companies they're interested in while they're still in school.

    Will some of your instructors who have contacts in industry give you contacts and a referral?

    As I recall from some of your earlier postings, you have a BS degree. When I was still working, the last several divisions I worked for rarely entertained hiring people with BS degrees. Most positions required MS or PhD as my group didn't have entry level positions. The only new hire with a BS degree was someone doing an internship while he was working on his MS and he let coworkers talk him into dropping out and coming to work for the group.
     
  4. Electronic_Maniac

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 26, 2017
    69
    0
    Ok sir. How to enhance my knowledge ?

    What are the best practices to do it?

    I dont have the financial backup for another degree.
    Please help
     
  5. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    11,640
    2,441
    Start your own enterprise. Build a few and sell a few. Wash, rinse, and repeat.
     
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  6. dl324

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 30, 2015
    6,977
    1,611
    Contact your instructors to see if they'll give you contacts and referrals. My school kept in contact with people after they graduated and they were our contacts for getting interviews.

    When I graduated, I only had one interview scheduled. It was at a company that had made offers to 100% of the graduates from my school that they invited for plant interviews; so I expected to work for that company.

    The day after my interview I drove by an HP facility while I was exploring the area. One of my instructors had told me to interview with them if I got the chance, so I went in and gave the receptionist my resume and turned to leave.

    It turned out they were interviewing a group of candidates that day, so she asked me to wait while she called to see if they wanted to interview me. I interviewed with them for the rest of the day and flew home the next.

    They had informed me that it would likely be several weeks before I heard anything from them. When I got home, HP had called and made me an offer over the phone.

    I wish I had thought to thank the receptionist for going out of her way to see if they wanted to interview me. Another receptionist might not have made the effort to do that.

    The other company did make me an offer, but I ended up working for HP. I started less than a month after I graduated and I didn't have any time to dwell on the recession that was going on at the time.
     
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  7. Electronic_Maniac

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 26, 2017
    69
    0
    Thank you sir!
     
  8. Gibson486

    Active Member

    Jul 20, 2012
    274
    17

    You do projects on your own time. I had an intern who was really bright. He had this project that he wanted to test out. I really encouraged him to work on it and gave him some minor advice to get him on his way. He then took it upon himself start the project and implement it. He took the project as far as he could. It sort of worked. But here is the thing, he was able see why it was not perfect and was able to give insight into what he would improve and what was his limitations were. He took this project and marketed himself with it. It landed him a great internship at a pretty good consulting firm and he is well on his way to getting a full time offer there. This is what I mean when I say you need to differentiate yourself. You either keep getting degrees (you become part of a smaller pool) or you show you have great potential and drive to get things done (you make yourself stand out). The first is the older way of doing it and works at more traditional companies. The ladder is sort of the up and coming way, but I personally think it is a better way.
     
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