What would the best approach be to attach new wires to this old hardware?

Thread Starter

Ed. M.

Joined Nov 8, 2017
27
Hi,

Please see below. I need to attach an additional set of six wires to the unit (ignore three connectors on the bottom left) and I'm wondering what would be the best approach:

Wiring.jpg

If you remove the solder pads, underneath is a circular hole. Ideally I'd prefer not to remove the existing wires if possible. I was thinking of melting away the solder, then stick the new wire through the hole and wrap it around itself, but I'm thinking there would be better approaches. Maybe there's a connector of some kind I could use? FYI the existing wires are so old they have "fabric" casing (not plastic).

Thanks.
- Ed.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,081
Solder wick + new solder and wires. The question is whether PVC is OK. If not, I would go with MIL-standard aircraft wire with fiberglass or Teflon insulation. Knyar insulation is also more heat resistant.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,602
Hi,

Please see below. I need to attach an additional set of six wires to the unit (ignore three connectors on the bottom left) and I'm wondering what would be the best approach:

View attachment 193665

If you remove the solder pads, underneath is a circular hole. Ideally I'd prefer not to remove the existing wires if possible. I was thinking of melting away the solder, then stick the new wire through the hole and wrap it around itself, but I'm thinking there would be better approaches. Maybe there's a connector of some kind I could use? FYI the existing wires are so old they have "fabric" casing (not plastic).

Thanks.
- Ed.
Without more information, I would label the wires, desolder them, clean up the terminals and re-tin them with decent lead-based solder, then add the new wires, in addition to the old, exactly as the old ones are currently soldered.
 

Thread Starter

Ed. M.

Joined Nov 8, 2017
27
Without more information, I would label the wires, desolder them, clean up the terminals and re-tin them with decent lead-based solder, then add the new wires, in addition to the old, exactly as the old ones are currently soldered.
I like your idea as replacing the wires in the picture would be a significant headache. All I've ever used is lead free solder. Would you please post a link to the type of solder you're referring to on perhaps Altex, Home Depot, or Amazon? Are there special procedures for dealing with lead-based solder?
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,602
I like your idea as replacing the wires in the picture would be a significant headache. All I've ever used is lead free solder. Would you please post a link to the type of solder you're referring to on perhaps Altex, Home Depot, or Amazon? Are there special procedures for dealing with lead-based solder?
Any solder with a 63/37 alloy will do. This is an example: https://www.amazon.com/Solder-Rosin-Electrical-Soldering-TAMINGTON/dp/B072WN1DMG which would be fine.

I prefer Kester, but you'd have to buy a larger spool, and it would set you back about 25 bucks or so. It would be a good investment if you are doing projects regularly, but it takes a long time to use it all.
 
For a quick easy job, I'd just re-tin the existing old connections so there will be flux on them. Skin and tin 3mm of the new wires and then just tag them on, you won't need to use the solder for tagging them on.

Or you can tin the pcb and solder them straight on there.
 
A particular soldering aid is liquid rosin flux, usually sold in small bottles at various retailers. It seems to improve the heat transfer and dispersal, or something of that nature. Use it for both de-soldering and re-soldering.
Here is a brief note regarding flux usage:
Flux Info
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,602
A particular soldering aid is liquid rosin flux, usually sold in small bottles at various retailers. It seems to improve the heat transfer and dispersal, or something of that nature. Use it for both de-soldering and re-soldering.
Here is a brief note regarding flux usage:
Flux Info
Flux cleans off oxides and prevents the formation of a new oxide layer during soldering by excluding oxygen.

In this case, it probably won't be needed since the terminals are already tinned.
 
What you have is just an old style Phenolic solder terminal strip. Brings back memories. I would just use a soldering pencil and remove the solder using a solder sucker or braided wick. The old wires look to be, as mentioned, fabric insulated. I would replace with new wire suitable for whatever the project is and use either 60/40 or 63/37 solder.

This is what you have:
solder terminal strip Phenolic.png

Just about any soldering pencil should work fine. Just make sure after desoldering the terminals you thoroughly clean them. Small stiff brush (acid brush) trimmed short and some isopropanol alcohol normally works well.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Ed. M.

Joined Nov 8, 2017
27
What you have is just an old style Phenolic solder terminal strip. Brings back memories. I would just use a soldering pencil and remove the solder using a solder sucker or braided wick. The old wires look to be, as mentioned, fabric insulated. I would replace with new wire suitable for whatever the project is and use either 60/40 or 63/37 solder.

This is what you have:
View attachment 193726

Just about any soldering pencil should work fine. Just make sure after desoldering the terminals you thoroughly clean them. Small stiff brush (acid brush) trimmed short and some isopropanol alcohol normally works well.

Ron
Yes that's what I have. When re-attaching the wires, what's the proper procedure? Do I try to wrap each pair or wires through each hole, then solder so that the entire hole is filled, or do I just place the wires across the hole and apply solder to cover them, which is what it looks like was done originally? Can I do this with thin solder or would I need to get some thicker? My iron tip is fairly big. Thanks.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,385
Either way it doesn't really matter. If you wanted a connection for extreme stress conditions you would wrap the wire around the lug after inserting in the open hole. If you can get the wire through the hole and then solder that would be good enough.

Thick or thin solder doesn't matter. Use solder with a rosin core for electrical work. Just make sure you heat the entire joint and allow it to cool solid before any movement is allowed.
 
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