When ‘new’ batteries don’t seem to solve the problem.

Thread Starter

SGLtech

Joined Dec 30, 2023
1
I am troubleshooting a garage door remote which uses one 27A battery.
I’m replacing an old battery which measures 11.97 V.
One new battery with Panasonic branding, expiry date 2024-10 measures 12.43 V, but it doesn’t fix the unreliability of the remote control.
An alternative new battery with GP branding, expiry date 07/2025, measures 12.33 V, but it also doesn’t fix the unreliability of the remote control.
My questions are:
1) What voltage would you normally expect from a brand new 27A battery?
2) How much of a concern is the expiry date of the batteries?
3) What else, besides voltage and expiry date might be influencing battery performance?
4) These batteries were bought cheap online because batteries bought at retail prices are way more expensive. Is this a false economy? Could I be wasting time with underpar batteries?
5) At what point would you decide to replace the remote control completely?
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
4,190
The remote should work with either the original battery (11.97 volts) or the new batteries. The rated voltage of these batteries is 12 volts.) Have you measured the voltage on the battery contacts in the remote with the button pressed on the remote ? Measuring the voltage that the remote sees confirms that the battery is making good contact. Holding the button pressed ensures that there is some current being drawn from the battery. I would not worry about the expiry date if the battery voltage is OK with some load on the battery and there is no sign of leaks or corrosion on the battery.
The fault could also be in the receiver section of the door opener. You could also check that the push button is working by doing resistance tests.

Les.
 

Hymie

Joined Mar 30, 2018
1,284
I would expect a 12V remote to continue to operate down to 10V (and maybe less), although with a reduced range.

If it is a battery/voltage issue, it is more likely that you have corrosion at the battery contacts, rendering even the best new battery useless.

Carefully inspect the battery contact surfaces and clean if necessary – I have improved things with the use of carefully placed aluminium foil (making better electrical contact); but be aware the foil can easily fall out of place if not secured by the fitted battery.
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
4,075
Nobody mentioned whether or not the Remote has ever worked as expected since newly installed.

Is there a second Remote-Control-Fob that has better performance ?

Has anything changed about the receiving Antenna on the Opener-Motor ?,
moved ?, damaged ?, covered-up or blocked by some object ?

You never know what you're going to get from China.
.
.
.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,538
Aside from the battery and battery connections, some remotes use switching arrangements that are subject to deterioration from corrosion. AND, at least one of them had corrosion issues inside that code setting switch, which caused it to send the incorrect code on occasion. So there are two other possibilities. To see iif it is really a battery issue, try operating the control standing very close to the antenna, because a weak signal may work from up close but not from a few feet away. If it is a different problem then distance would not have an efect.
 

ThePanMan

Joined Mar 13, 2020
793
OR OR OR OR - - - - and this has happened to me, the GDO (Garage Door Opener) sometimes forgets the unique code sent by an opener. My Genie GDO can be programmed to accept up to eight different remotes, as long as the remotes are compatible with Genie. For reasons I don't know or understand, sometimes a working remote quits working. Regardless of new batteries or not. Regardless of distance from the FOB to the GDO. Simply reprogramming the GDO to accept that code seems to get it working again. And it works for years to come.

In my case it could possibly be a deteriorating FOB where the unique frequency it transmits changes slightly and the GDO no longer opens to that FOB. IF your GDO has a "Learn" function then try reprogramming it to the FOB. That might be the whole problem, and you're chasing your tail trying to figure out why the mail comes late. One thing may have nothing to do with the other. I'm betting a nickel your GDO just needs to be reprogrammed to that FOB. Betting a nickel because that's not necessarily the issue. But worth checking into before you start spending money.

As @Tonyr1084 always says "Fully diagnose the problem before you start throwing parts at it."
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,538
OR OR OR OR - - - - and this has happened to me, the GDO (Garage Door Opener) sometimes forgets the unique code sent by an opener. My Genie GDO can be programmed to accept up to eight different remotes, as long as the remotes are compatible with Genie. For reasons I don't know or understand, sometimes a working remote quits working. Regardless of new batteries or not. Regardless of distance from the FOB to the GDO. Simply reprogramming the GDO to accept that code seems to get it working again. And it works for years to come.

In my case it could possibly be a deteriorating FOB where the unique frequency it transmits changes slightly and the GDO no longer opens to that FOB. IF your GDO has a "Learn" function then try reprogramming it to the FOB. That might be the whole problem, and you're chasing your tail trying to figure out why the mail comes late. One thing may have nothing to do with the other. I'm betting a nickel your GDO just needs to be reprogrammed to that FOB. Betting a nickel because that's not necessarily the issue. But worth checking into before you start spending money.

As @Tonyr1084 always says "Fully diagnose the problem before you start throwing parts at it."
"Reprogramming may also repair problems caused by slightly corroded contacts in that programming switch. THAT can be another reason for a device "forgetting" the correct code.
And CERTAINLY that advice from TONY is Very Good Advice!
 
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