What's classifications for this grounding system ?

Thread Starter

meowsoft

Joined Feb 27, 2021
494
What's classifications for this grounding system ?
and do you think what's best surge arrester for my client with ground system like this ?
Is this TN-C or TN-C-S or something ?
For 220v 2a - 50a (Small to Medium house), ground wire and neutral wire is connected in KWH meter, also ground wire between kwh meter and LVMDP ground is usually not bonded, and neutral and ground connection only allowed at KWH meter
Ground system.png
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,805
TN−S PE and N are separate conductors that are connected together only near the power source.
TN−C A combined PEN conductor fulfills the functions of both a PE and an N conductor. (on 230/400 V systems normally only used for distribution networks)
TN−C−S Part of the system uses a combined PEN conductor, which is at some point split up into separate PE and N lines. The combined PEN conductor typically occurs between the substation and the entry point into the building, and earth and neutral are separated in the service head. In the UK, this system is also known as protective multiple earthing (PME), because of the practice of connecting the combined neutral-and-earth conductor via the shortest practicable route to local earth rods at the source and at intervals along the distribution networks to each premises, to provide both system earthing and equipment earthi

For in depth on the subject I would suggest obtaining a copy of Earthing & Grounding by Eustace Soares.
 

Thread Starter

meowsoft

Joined Feb 27, 2021
494
TN−S PE and N are separate conductors that are connected together only near the power source.
TN−C A combined PEN conductor fulfills the functions of both a PE and an N conductor. (on 230/400 V systems normally only used for distribution networks)
TN−C−S Part of the system uses a combined PEN conductor, which is at some point split up into separate PE and N lines. The combined PEN conductor typically occurs between the substation and the entry point into the building, and earth and neutral are separated in the service head. In the UK, this system is also known as protective multiple earthing (PME), because of the practice of connecting the combined neutral-and-earth conductor via the shortest practicable route to local earth rods at the source and at intervals along the distribution networks to each premises, to provide both system earthing and equipment earthi

For in depth on the subject I would suggest obtaining a copy of Earthing & Grounding by Eustace Soares.
- Only grounded neutral wire and phase wire came from utility
- Grounded neutral wire is grounded at utility smart meter; in my area, utilty smart meter in small home act like a service panel in US, some is only use 220v 10a, even some home only 220v 2a 440watt for entire home; it's far from US 240v 100a or 200a standard's
- By default ground wire is also connected together with neutral at utility KWH meter; but some home with big electricity load, it's make another ground rods, and disconnect ground wire from kwh meter, then connect to that owns ground rods
- In this case (with added own ground rods for LVMDP), LVMDP neutral and ground is still separated, because neutral and ground wire should not connected after KWH meter; and sometimes connect it at LVMDP still trigger KWH meter tampering status, except is LVMDP is far far away from KWH meter, usually more than 10 meters
- Some ground wire and rods at KWH meter is commonly not adequate and have bad resistance, so... why we use own earth wire separated from utility, default is only 6mm² bare copper conductor with only 4 feet length driven rods... far from enough for surge arrester, and big load

It's that system in picture can be classified as protective multiple earthing ?
 
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