What i need for power led lamp with conductive paint

Thread Starter

Craxxxx

Joined Nov 20, 2019
1
Hi people.. I'm new here
So its kind of beginner question.
I'm product design student and I'm making a desk lamp and i want to use the conductive paint (bare) insted of cable .
Its need to be baterry based led lamp.
Do i need any special electric circuit knowledge for this?
Or just draw insted of the cable?
Thanks alot
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
9,351
Welcome to AAC!

Just paint where you want conductors. Take care to insulate them as appropriate when you're finished and to consider the resistivity of the painted conductors and the amount of current they'll carry.

You should be able to find some examples on the internet. People sometimes do this when they're attaching LEDs to clothing.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
4,750
If I were curious enough I would likely spend the $13 USD and get a tube of this stuff just to see how it worked. The guys who make the linked stuff mention the conductivity on this page. Combine it with some copper foil strips and I guess one could get creative.

Ron
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
5,853
If I were curious enough I would likely spend the $13 USD and get a tube of this stuff just to see how it worked. The guys who make the linked stuff mention the conductivity on this page. Combine it with some copper foil strips and I guess one could get creative.

Ron
Wow, you really need to paint that on thick to use it. The ad states it’s resistivity for a layer 50 feet thick!
 

TeeKay6

Joined Apr 20, 2019
534
If I were curious enough I would likely spend the $13 USD and get a tube of this stuff just to see how it worked. The guys who make the linked stuff mention the conductivity on this page. Combine it with some copper foil strips and I guess one could get creative.

Ron
One of the reviewers at the Amazon listing gave this info: "150 Ohm/in for 1/4" wide strip, 75 Ohm/in for 1/2", 40 Ohm/in for 3/4" and 30 Ohm/in for a 1" wide strip." No mention of the thickness that was applied.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,359
The silver nanoparticle "paint" mentioned in #4 is based on the very old Tollens reagent and has the conductivity of silver. It reportedly can be soldered and is quite easy to make. It was publicly reported initially in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), then apparently patented. The developers simply replaced non-volatile components of Tollens reagent with more volatile compounds. Tollens reagent goes way back and was used for silvering mirrors, like telescope mirrors..

If used commercially in the US, one may still need to pay royalties. The prior public release may affect international patents. I am very out of date on patent law. List pricing is quite inflated compared to the cost of making it, but for a commercial product, the royalties might be more reasonable.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
10,620
If used commercially in the US, one may still need to pay royalties. The prior public release may affect international patents. I am very out of date on patent law.
Tollens reagent was public knowledge way back in the '80s (the earliest reference I found in a quick google), so any patents for the reagent itself are long expired. But specific uses of the reagent might still be the subject of valid patents (I haven't checked).
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,359
In old patent law, one could not patent a principle or a molecule per se (i.e., a "composition of nature"). At that time, a patent had to be an embodiment or process. Tollens dates way back. By"80's," I presume you mean 1880's.

More recently, gene sequences (in whole or part) have been patented. My presumption is that the modified Tollens process was patentable in the US. It was published in 2012. My guess is the patent is still applicable in the US as one used to have a year to patent after publication. However, when I doing stuff like that, we were told that the 1-year grace period was not recognized by all nations. I have not kept up on those rules.

I have attached my notes on the process based on the JACS article. One could change those reagents and still get volatile products. I do not know whether the original patent includes such modifications/generalizations. They often do.

Again, if its really for a commercial product, the user needs to get competent advice on the patent.
 

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