What DAQ? device can I use to read a Gear-Tooth Speed sensor?

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
Hi

I am trying to measure a speed of a rotating shaft that has gears on it for the Hall effect sensor. There will be 3 speed sensors.

DSCN1229-700x525.jpg

What device can I use to measure this speed sensor? The sensor produces a pulse with each passing gear tooth which produces a square wave. I figured that if I can read the frequency of this sensor, I can translate that to an RPM reading. But I do not know what device to read this sensor with.
rpm3.gif

Digital_Gear_Tooth_Sensor.jpg


Any suggestions on a device that can read maybe 1000 Hz pulses?

Thank you.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
2,453
Hi

I am trying to measure a speed of a rotating shaft that has gears on it for the Hall effect sensor. There will be 3 speed sensors.
What device can I use to measure this speed sensor? The sensor produces a pulse with each passing gear tooth which produces a square wave. I figured that if I can read the frequency of this sensor, I can translate that to an RPM reading. But I do not know what device to read this sensor with.

Any suggestions on a device that can read maybe 1000 Hz pulses?

Thank you.
There are a number of on-line projects for building an arduino frequency meter. Here is one of them:
https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/mircemk/diy-simple-frequency-meter-up-to-6-5mhz-6b496e
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,789
For starters, the definitive diagnostic tool is an oscilloscope.
The next readily available test instrument is a DMM with frequency option.
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
There are a number of on-line projects for building an arduino frequency meter. Here is one of them:
https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub/mircemk/diy-simple-frequency-meter-up-to-6-5mhz-6b496e
Thank you for the response.

I am avoiding having to spend a lot of resources constructing my own device, as the Project I am doing is for high speed data acquisition and needs to be as accurate. The speed sensor is one of the many sensors including temperature, pressure, etc.

If there's anything ready on the market that I can interface with USB 6002 from National instruments, that would help as well. Second option would be if it is stand alone maybe but can log data.
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
For starters, the definitive diagnostic tool is an oscilloscope.
The next readily available test instrument is a DMM with frequency option.
Yes, I do have such a multimeter with frequency reading, but there will be 3 sensors into total.

I am trying to design a data logging system that will read and record the data, in this case, the speed.
 

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,773
I don't understand why you are talking about using 3 sensors.
Here is a link to a tachometer that I designed several years ago using hall gear tooth sensors. It uses a PIC16F628 and can be configured to use between 1 and 100 pulses per revolution. There are probably more modern gear tooth sensors than the ones that I used.

Les.
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
Here is a link to a tachometer that I designed several years ago using hall gear tooth sensors. It uses a PIC16F628 and can be configured to use between 1 and 100 pulses per revolution. There are probably more modern gear tooth sensors than the ones that I used.

Les.
This device is impressive, I knew about counters but I did not know that they existed in IC format. I can consider something like this my my word, it looks like a project on its own.
 

BobTPH

Joined Jun 5, 2013
5,458
It is a microcontroller. It needs to be programmed and can pretty much anything logic can do except perhaps for high speed.
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
This is the device I am using for the data login with LabVIEW. It only has 1 build in counter which is why I feel stuck now. I tried using the digital input and programmatically had them reading RPM but I ran into an Aliasing issue where the speed of the digital input runs at a lower frequency than I am trying to read. There's devices that can do the same job but they cost thousands.

download.jpg
 
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MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,789
Since you are using LabVIEW what you need are three frequency-to-USB converters.
I would have to search to see what is available off-the-shelf. An alternative is to get someone to program an Arduino board for you.
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
Since you are using LabVIEW what you need are three frequency-to-USB converters.
I would have to search to see what is available off-the-shelf. An alternative is to get someone to program an Arduino board for you.
Yes Yes Yes,
Sorry for not indicating the bigger picture of my device setup, my apologies to everyone.

Yes I am using LabVIEW and that Frequency to USB device just made me light up like a light bulb. Please, if you find anything of the sort, I can have it interface with LabVIEW via serial or something like that - then I can programmatically convert the frequency to RPM using the formula and data log the files as well.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
6,815
Years ago when I was tasked to do this I used Action Pak and Red Lion F/V signal conditioning. Today I see much less costly modules available online. The units I used dropped right into octal base sockets and were programmable for the upper frequency limits. They also had programmable outputs of 0 - 20ma, 4 - 20 ma, 0 - 5.0 v and 0 - 10 v. They were very accurate and we were looking at pump speeds as well as other motor speeds. I would be on the F/V bandwagon too.

Ron
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
How accurate and over what range of speeds? There are a number of easy-to-use ICs that convert a frequency (pulsed DC) to a voltage, typically 0 - 10v. Here are some examples

edit: @BobTPH and I on the same wavelength again lol!
My frequency range to is up to 400 Hz,
(reduces teeth to 2 - making it 2 pulse per rev to lower frequency requirements)

My device takes 10 v analog and 5 v digital. (I do have a digital to frequency code but not as reliable)
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
Years ago when I was tasked to do this I used Action Pak and Red Lion F/V signal conditioning. Today I see much less costly modules available online. The units I used dropped right into octal base sockets and were programmable for the upper frequency limits. They also had programmable outputs of 0 - 20ma, 4 - 20 ma, 0 - 5.0 v and 0 - 10 v. They were very accurate and we were looking at pump speeds as well as other motor speeds. I would be on the F/V bandwagon too.

Ron
Thank you. Please share a link, will check it out.
 

Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
@Irving
Those examples are on the money , frequency to voltage is awesome, love it.

I am nervous about making my IC circuit… I will give it a try and face my fears. I have a soldering iron too. What PCB (link) can I use…? Any other tool? Good videos? I sometimes get confused by the circuits
 
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Thread Starter

Kulanib

Joined Jul 6, 2022
51
Years ago when I was tasked to do this I used Action Pak and Red Lion F/V signal conditioning. Today I see much less costly modules available online. The units I used dropped right into octal base sockets and were programmable for the upper frequency limits. They also had programmable outputs of 0 - 20ma, 4 - 20 ma, 0 - 5.0 v and 0 - 10 v. They were very accurate and we were looking at pump speeds as well as other motor speeds. I would be on the F/V bandwagon too.

Ron
I might have found something already built and ready A frequency to Voltage converter (F/V) with good range. My Sensor is a NPN which will match the specs.

Awesome, will keep looking, and because of the high frequency range, I can increase my gear tooth at 25, which will be 25 pulses per revolution.
 
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