Unknown Component

Thread Starter

elliotth30

Joined Nov 16, 2020
3
Hello!

I'm sure this is going to be an extremely basic question for many of you, however, I'm a graphic design student slowly trying to find my way into the electronics world. - so any help

I'm trying to identify the component (shown within the red circle) as I'm currently working on a project which requires me trying to repurpose this schematic for basic proof of concept. From my understanding, I believe it to be an Electrolytic Capacitor? But am unable to find anything, even using image searches, is It possible that it's a symbol native to japan?

TLDR: I'm trying to identify the component (shown within the red circle)

Unknown Component.png
Sources:
http://elm-chan.org/works/sd8p/rc/sd8p_mo.png
http://elm-chan.org/works/sd8p/report.html

Thank you very much for taking the time to read and help me :)
If there is any further information needed please say and I will supply it or try my best

//Elliott
 

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dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,873
Welcome to AAC!

The parallel plates with the 100u value could only be a capacitor. A 100uF value would most likely be electrolytic or tantalum. Tantalum are also electrolytic, but we differentiate them from other electrolytics due to it's high capacitance per volume, low working voltage, and aversion to reverse polarity.
 

Thread Starter

elliotth30

Joined Nov 16, 2020
3

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,000
1 Farad is
1,000 Millifarads; is
1,000,000 Microfarads; is
1,000,000,000 Nanofarads; is
1,000,000,000,000 Picofarads.

1 Pf (Picofarad) is
0.000,1 Nf; is
0.000,000,1µF (microfarad)
0.000,000,000,1 Mf (Millifarad)
0.000,000,000,000,1 Farad

Farads is the capacitive rating.
Volts is the amount of voltage a particular cap can handle without shorting out or exploding.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
12,873
Some older capacitors used MFD to mean microfarads. We always question when we see an MF suffix because most will take that to mean megafarads (1,000,000 F) which would be a huge capacitor.

EDIT: We also question when we see mF. We'd normally take that to mean millifarads and the user probably means microfarads. Millifarads is still a large capacitance. Though there are super caps with multi-Farad capacitances these days.
 
Last edited:

bloguetronica

Joined Apr 27, 2007
1,449
A capacitor of 10V will suffice, there. The MCU can output pulses from 0 to 3.3V, so a 10V rated capacitor will be more than enough. My only concern is if the MCU has enough drive power to drive a 8Ω load. That would require 412mA of peak current.
 

bertus

Joined Apr 5, 2008
21,369
Hello,

@Tonyr1084 , Should it not be:
1 Farad is
1,000 mF (milliFarads); is
1,000,000 μF (microFarads); is
1,000,000,000 nF (nanoFarads); is
1,000,000,000,000 pF (picoFarads).

1 pF (Picofarad) is
0.001 nF; is
0.000,001µF (microfarad)
0.000,000,001 mF (Millifarad)
0.000,000,000,001 Farad

Watch the capital and small letters.

SI_prefixes.gif

Bertus
 

bloguetronica

Joined Apr 27, 2007
1,449
You can solder SMD capacitors with a soldering iron, no problems at all. I've soldered many SMD parts via this method, including very small 0603 components. That can style can be perfectly soldered with some flux, so the solder will wet the leads beneath the part as well.

The OP has chosen that part for reasons we don't know. Probably the project or the layout requires it (although personally I would choose a leaded polymer cap from a reputable brand, and change the layout).
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,000
µ = Mu (pronounced like a cow saying mooo) meaning "Micro"
M(FD) = "Milli"
n = "Nano"
p = "Pico"

dl324 referred to MFD. MFD is not used much anymore. And MF can also be confusing because a capital M typically stands for Mega (or MEG). Look at resistors: 1MΩ is 1,000,000 ohms whereas 1mΩ is 1 milli ohm. 1µΩ is micro ohm. But not everyone can print a µ symbol easily. In a Windows based operating system the way to type the µ is to press and hold [ALT] then press [2] [3] [0]. On a Mac OS the command is to press and hold [option] and then press [m] (small M). ALT Large M is " Â ".
 

Delta Prime

Joined Nov 15, 2019
1,027
Hello there :) QUOTE="elliotth30, post: 1571849, member: 745788"]
I'm currently working on a project which requires me trying to repurpose this schematic for basic proof of concept.
[/QUOTE] in the yellow circle the first thing I saw only because of the subject matter "capacitors" and it threw me off.Rather odd arrangement.
IMG_20201123_013138.jpg
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
3,206
In your yellow circuit, the left part is a film or ceramic capacitor maybe 0.1uF. The right symbol is a 3.3V battery with its positive terminal at the top.
 
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