Turn an LED on after it automatically turns off by unaccessable timer.

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
Hallmark ornaments made a great model of the Nautilus submarine from 20,000 leagues Under the Sea. It's very small and has batteries to turn on some LEDs to light several important windows. Unfortunately, Hallmark designed the lights to go out after about 20 seconds. This is a problem, I want to power the sub (boat) externally (hidden wires) and keep the lights on. IMG_5835.jpgObviously, some form of plastic surgery will be required.. So, I started into the battery compartment with a Dremel tool fighting encapsulation material and battery compartment plastic... I was able to free the small push button which slightly protrudes the deck. This is a momentary button (not push-on, push-off), which initiates the timed illumination.IMG_5854 2.jpg
Having freed the power wires, and the blue switch wires, I was able to see them pass aver the ship's salon area and move upward into the wheelhouse where the second light is needed (the eyes of the monster) .. This is an area I will not violate with a jittery Dremel tool. There must be another way:IMG_5855 2.jpg What do you think of an onboard small circuit that when powered, will start the lights (the button is replaced by a very small solid-state relay or equivalent. When on, the LEDs draw 30ma with 3.3 DCV main. The AI circuit must know when the wheelhouse turns off the LEDs (no more 30ma flowing). Instantly, the solid-state relay turns them back on again!... and so on... forever.

Yes.. this will look like a reactor malfunction .. but, the ship is the first of its kind.. and probably there are some electrical issues .. perhaps some random dimming could be added.. but, that's an upgrade for later.

This boat is available on Amazon and eBay ... Has been around since 2010? Yet, Hallmark has lost the wiring diagram, and all info .. except that it uses LR44 batteries.. which it doesn't, tho it does say that in the battery compartment ... Actually it only uses LR41 .. but soon with your help, it will not use any batteries.. Thanks much .. regards, Michael
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,608
Hallmark ornaments made a great model of the Nautilus submarine from 20,000 leagues Under the Sea. It's very small and has batteries to turn on some LEDs to light several important windows. Unfortunately, Hallmark designed the lights to go out after about 20 seconds. This is a problem, I want to power the sub (boat) externally (hidden wires) and keep the lights on. View attachment 245564Obviously, some form of plastic surgery will be required.. So, I started into the battery compartment with a Dremel tool fighting encapsulation material and battery compartment plastic... I was able to free the small push button which slightly protrudes the deck. This is a momentary button (not push-on, push-off), which initiates the timed illumination.View attachment 245565
Having freed the power wires, and the blue switch wires, I was able to see them pass aver the ship's salon area and move upward into the wheelhouse where the second light is needed (the eyes of the monster) .. This is an area I will not violate with a jittery Dremel tool. There must be another way:View attachment 245566 What do you think of an onboard small circuit that when powered, will start the lights (the button is replaced by a very small solid-state relay or equivalent. When on, the LEDs draw 30ma with 3.3 DCV main. The AI circuit must know when the wheelhouse turns off the LEDs (no more 30ma flowing). Instantly, the solid-state relay turns them back on again!... and so on... forever.

Yes.. this will look like a reactor malfunction .. but, the ship is the first of its kind.. and probably there are some electrical issues .. perhaps some random dimming could be added.. but, that's an upgrade for later.

This boat is available on Amazon and eBay ... Has been around since 2010? Yet, Hallmark has lost the wiring diagram, and all info .. except that it uses LR44 batteries.. which it doesn't, tho it does say that in the battery compartment ... Actually it only uses LR41 .. but soon with your help, it will not use any batteries.. Thanks much .. regards, Michael
Might be able to replace the button with the same type but toggle on/off.
The timer might be a simple resistor/capacitor timer and you might be able to replace the cap with a jumper wire.
Can you post a photo of the internal circuit?
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
654
If you have an ohm meter of DMM, measure the resistance between
A and battery +
A and battery -
B and battery +
B and battery -
Ive done this dozens of times for similar items.
 

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
Might be able to replace the button with the same type but toggle on/off.
The timer might be a simple resistor/capacitor timer and you might be able to replace the cap with a jumper wire.
Can you post a photo of the internal circuit?
Hi.. thanks for the reply... Can't replace the button with another button .. that would be too easy .. just short the button wires together, and it would always be "on" .. There is no circuit diagram .. Hallmark couldn't find it (I asked) What you see in the 2nd & 3rd photo is all I have. no way to reach any other contacts than DC in (red-black) and a button to activate lights (2 blues) that's it... if you hold down the button... the timer still turns off the lights after about 20 seconds. If you short the button, then apply power, the lights will not come on, you must remove the short and re-short and the lights come on for the 20 sec. The light control system is looking for a positive-going pulse. This is solid-state controls here.. :)
 

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
If you have an ohm meter of DMM, measure the resistance between
A and battery +
A and battery -
B and battery +
B and battery -
Ive done this dozens of times for similar items.
Thanks for the comment.. I don't understand where A or B is.. do you have a schematic in mind? and why would I do this.. what would the results indicate? Thanks.
 

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
Hi MrSalts... Understood... will do .. but, why am I doing this? standby ... got it the only resistance values indicated is between "B" and - Battery (indicate the same connection.. all other readings between A and battery + or - are too high to measure. naturally, The "battery isn't there anymore... just the red & black wires .. red being positive.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
654
OH... looks like we would apply a pulse to "A" ?
Exactly.

Now we need a way to make a pulse train and apply to "A". But, a quick first test, connect to your breadboard and touch "a" with a wire connected to "-" power to see if it turns on. If not, try touching a wire from "a" to "+" power to see if triggers.
 

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
What you are asking me to do is simulate the momentary button?... whenever the lights go out... they can always be turned on by the button. In the new circuit, the button would be replaced by a solid-state relay normally open, the circuit would be powered and if there is no current flowing through the LEDs (30ma) the circuit would activate the SS relay and supply a pulse that triggers a solid-state device that permits current to flow through the LEDs... When the installed timer (R/C circuit) turns off the current to the LEDs .. our new circuit must sense that, and re-pulse the light control SS device to start over... really a pain in the butt... but, I can not think of any way else to do it... or how actually to do it. Please suggest how you intend to do this before I risk blowing something in the subs circuits.. :)
 

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
Ya know... Perhaps we just build a circuit that continuously pulses "A" with 3 to 4.5 volts every second... it's won't affect the light control circuit until the lights go off... it would be like pushing the button every second .. every 20 seconds, it would finally turn the lights back on! :)
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
654
Ya know... Perhaps we just build a circuit that continuously pulses "A" with 3 to 4.5 volts every second... it's won't affect the light control circuit until the lights go off... it would be like pushing the button every second .. every 20 seconds, it would finally turn the lights back on! :)
That's the plan. A simple 555 timer running at about 40Hz
 

Thread Starter

MFL

Joined Aug 13, 2021
41
I just don't work with electronics circuits anymore.. do a lot of automation machine programming.. but that's not electronics...
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
654
I sounds like "b" is connected to ground and, when you press the button, "a" is connected to "b" and connected to ground.
 
Top