THROUGH HOLE LED SLANTED

Thread Starter

Fatimah93

Joined Mar 10, 2023
6
SLANTED LED.jpgSLANTED LED.jpg Hi everyone. I would like to seek your opinion about the TH LED where this component slanted after solder wave. Is it okay if we have slanted LED on the board?
 

jiggermole

Joined Jul 29, 2016
161
That looks like a production part so my guess would be that the customer would be the one making that call. Fit form and function. So as long as it functions and it doesn't impede the enclosure I would call it good.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
8,976
Welcome to AAC.

While the slant is concerning aesthetically, the larger question for me is why there is so much standoff.

Is there a light pipe that it interfaces with. or some aperture in a case? If not, why were the leads formed that way?

A component standing that far off the board can be bent, shorting the leads, or breaking them. If the stand off height is functional, you should consider using standoff support* to prevent any deformation of the leads in handling and assembly.

*Just an example, not an endorsement for your application. There are many options.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,275
View attachment 298658View attachment 298658 Hi everyone. I would like to seek your opinion about the TH LED where this component slanted after solder wave. Is it okay if we have slanted LED on the board?
Hi,

A slanted LED may or may not present a problem it depends on what the rest of the assembly looks like. Does the LED have to fit through a hole for example in order to be seen properly by the end user. If so, it may not fit or may have to be coaxed into bending slightly to fit. It is even possible the slant is on purpose.

I did a board once where the LED was just a 3mm diameter type and it had to fit through a 3mm diameter hole in the product case. If it did not align properly it could make assembly more difficult or maybe not even possible. So, it depends on what the rest of the product looks like. To determine for sure we'd have to see the case mechanical drawings.

Of course, if it is a one-off product, it's easy to fix, but if in a production run and they all turn out that way it could become a rather large problem for assembly time.

There are many reasons why it may be mounted farther off the board.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,673
judging by the placement and height of surrounding components, it is likely that this is an internal indicator, meant for testing or troubleshooting - unless there is a light pipe or this is an open frame device. if there is a light pipe, maybe the LED is raised in order to come closer to it... functionally this is not an issue. if it bothers you just bend it back till straight, then you can cringe about kink in one of the LED legs. ;)
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
8,976
A more careful look at the photo seems to show that an SMD component overlaps the LED base, which may be why the LED is elevated, but if that’s true, it’s not great. I could also be much lower and reduce the risk of shorting during handling and assembly.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
16,716
Is it okay if we have slanted LED on the board?
It looks like an insertion problem to me:
ledClip.jpg
It depends on how the LED is being used.

If you're tempted to reposition without unsoldering both leads, make sure you don't apply any stress where the leads exit the epoxy enclosure.
 

Jon Chandler

Joined Jun 12, 2008
994
If you're tempted to reposition without unsoldering both leads, make sure you don't apply any stress where the leads exit the epoxy enclosure.
I watched a YouTuber install LEDs flush to the board which ended up slanted. He grabbed them with needle-nosed pliers and straightened them. He was surprised when most of them didn't work.
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
11,275
Hi again,

I was going to say, if you bend them back you should not grab the LED epoxy case to do that. You should grab the longer lead with a pair of long nose pliers near the epoxy case, then another second pair under that. Give the second pair a small twist and the lead on that side will become shorter, all while not letting the lead near the plastic package bend. You may be able to do this with just the second pair of pliers just make sure the lead close to the package does not bend away from the package ... do all the adjustments in the longer leg itself only. This action will be somewhat similar to an accordion bellows with just one fold.
The shorter lead will also bend a little but it should be ok as long as the LED is not too far off to begin with.

It could also be that the longer leads were to protect the LED from excess heat during soldering, perhaps even using a heat sink clamped to the leads while soldering. It could also be that some sort of adjustment was to be applied later to match up with some physical dimensional requirements.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
7,783
My 2¢:
Heat the solder to molten on the negative lead (the one connected to the giant cup inside), that's the Cathode (if I didn't get that backwards again). With the solder molten - move the LED closer to the position you want it. Then let the solder freeze. Now the other lead is under stress that must be relieved. Reheat that to molten and the lead will move and the LED will stand straight. Don't be surprised if you have to do this a few times. Just don't use too much heat or dwell too long with the heat. Just apply lateral pressure to the LED while heating the one lead. Once the solder goes molten, remove your iron and hold the LED still until the solder freezes. Then do the same to the other lead. If you have to - push the LED further in the direction you want it to go if you didn't get it fully positioned the first time.

As to your question:
Is it okay if we have slanted LED on the board?
Sure it is. IF it doesn't violate "Fit" - "Form" - and/or "Function". Chances are you can move it safely. But at present I don't see any reason to mess with it at all. Reheating solder joints DOES take a toll on the joint itself. Rework a joint enough and it will totally fail. I know. I was a Micro-Section Technician for four years and I investigated a number of board failures due to excessive attempts at reworking a joint. It can get quite ugly. Wish I had a picture of the worst case I've ever seen. And I've seen a lot.

Bottom line: If it doesn't NEED to be moved - don't move it. If it DOES need to be moved, I'd opt for the suggested method above. If all else fails - you can probably bend it into position. There's enough lead length to allow for that. But again, I think that fixing something that isn't broken is asinine.
 
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