Theoretical values for ”natural frequency”, currents and voltage at electrical resonance.

Thread Starter

crackhead227

Joined Feb 11, 2019
22
I am supposed to calculate the theoretical values for ”natural frequency”, currents and voltages at electrical resonance for this circuit.

I should use the measured values for the resistance and the inductance of the coil. Also the measured value of the capacitance to the capacitor. The internal resistance of signal generator must be used in the calculations!

The voltage source should be used as a references for all phase angles.

Krets.jpeg


Measured Values:
Inductance of a Coil:
56,91 mH
Angular frequency: 5529 rad/s
Theoretical Resonance: 980 Hz
Resistance of the Coil: 36 Ω
Capacitor: 481,7 uF
U: 7,02 V @ 1KHz


I got access to these formulas which should be used.
"Spole" = Coil
Formulas.jpeg
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
26,068
You need to show YOUR best attempt to solve YOUR homework.

What conditions do you think apply at the natural frequency of the circuit?
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
7,758
I am supposed to calculate the theoretical values for ”natural frequency”, currents and voltages at electrical resonance for this circuit.

I should use the measured values for the resistance and the inductance of the coil. Also the measured value of the capacitance to the capacitor. The internal resistance of signal generator must be used in the calculations!

The voltage source should be used as a references for all phase angles.

View attachment 197408


Measured Values:
Inductance of a Coil:
56,91 mH
Angular frequency: 5529 rad/s
Theoretical Resonance: 980 Hz
Resistance of the Coil: 36 Ω
Capacitor: 481,7 uF
U: 7,02 V @ 1KHz


I got access to these formulas which should be used.
"Spole" = Coil
View attachment 197409
There seems to be some problems with this circuit and problem statement.

First, the "theoretical" "resonant" frequency does not seem to be correct given the parts values shown. Where did that come from?
Second, the true resonant frequency may not represent the true physical resonance. It may represent one form of electrical resonance but i would think this problem would be more well defined. You can still calculate the "natural" frequency though, but you had better go over that again or say where you got that number from as it does not look right at all for this circuit.
 
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