Technology node used for PIC uCs

Thread Starter

noble_soul

Joined Feb 10, 2016
7
Can someone please tell me (or help me find out) the technology node (1.2, 0.9, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4 or 0.25 micron) used for fabricating the following PIC microcontrollers: PIC16F1829, PIC16F687 and PIC18F14K22. I could not find that information on the microchip website and not much info on it on the web. Thank you in advance
 

JohnInTX

Joined Jun 26, 2012
3,947
The 2012 Corporate Quality Handbook says this about processes:
PROCESS TECHNOLOGY
Microchip’s wafer fabrication processes have been
developed with reliability and manufacturability as their
primary goals. All products manufactured at Microchip
make use of a common N-well CMOS process through
which modules are modified to create the specific functions
required by the product (EEPROM, MCU, logic,
Enhanced Flash, analog and EPROM). The baseline
N-well CMOS process is released on mature manufacturing
lines that support 1.2, 0.9, 0.7, 0.5, 0.4 and 0.25
micron technologies. All devices utilize a proprietary
passivation suitable for a wide variety of package
types. Microchip manufactures 8-inch wafers.
That said, I don't know of any resource that crosses part numbers with the process technology. Any given part number may go through a 'die shrink' or redesign and the only way to tell (that I know of) is the silicon revision code. I don't know why you'd need to know this but you could ask uCHIP directly. Include the P/N, date code and silicon revision (reported by a programmer) with your request.

Good luck
 

Thread Starter

noble_soul

Joined Feb 10, 2016
7
The 2012 Corporate Quality Handbook says this about processes:

That said, I don't know of any resource that crosses part numbers with the process technology. Any given part number may go through a 'die shrink' or redesign and the only way to tell (that I know of) is the silicon revision code. I don't know why you'd need to know this but you could ask uCHIP directly. Include the P/N, date code and silicon revision (reported by a programmer) with your request.

Good luck
I came across that Corporate Quality Handbook as well, but unfortunately (and understandably) it does not give specifics. I will try asking uChip directly, thanks for the advice.
 

RichardO

Joined May 4, 2013
2,271
Interesting question. In the past, Microchip used low density processes because they got better (or at least good enough) quality at lower cost. Nowadays, I doubt that this is the case.
 
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