Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
I want to make my own sound console what are some important things i should consider and recommended stuff im probably gonna need(such as IC's, resistors, capacitors, filters and more)?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
18,793
I want to make my own sound console what are some important things i should consider and recommended stuff im probably gonna need(such as IC's, resistors, capacitors, filters and more)?
That is a pretty vague set of requirements. Are you going to bring it into being all at once, or are you going to build components and assemble the complete project over time? How you go about this will depend on your skills in design, fabrication purchasing, and mechanical assembly. It sounds like a daunting project. What time frame did you have in mind?
 

Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
That is a pretty vague set of requirements. Are you going to bring it into being all at once, or are you going to build components and assemble the complete project over time? How you go about this will depend on your skills in design, fabrication purchasing, and mechanical assembly. It sounds like a daunting project. What time frame did you have in mind?
As u said im probably gonna build components and assemble them over time
I've already started experimenting with some
OpAmp rca input and balanced passive mic pre amplification and gain
I didn't and don't have a time frame in my mind
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
2,403
If you want your project to be successful, you need to start by writing down your wish list. It should include the "must haves", The "would be nice" and the "pipe dreams". That would give you a goal to work for and a much better idea for us of what you really want.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,485
Start by writing down your wish list.
Look at what is available commercially to help you write down your requirements:

  1. Number of Channels
  2. Mono vs stereo
  3. Input types, XLR microphones, phantom power, 1/4" jacks, RCA jacks etc.
  4. Input levels and impedance
  5. equalizer
  6. fader
  7. monitor
  8. mute
  9. VU meter
  10. master equ and level
  11. output level and impedance, jacks
  12. bluetooth


1654299733986.png


1654299538529.png
 

Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
What things do you think will be the biggest obstacle(s) to progress toward that goal?
I think that one of the first things that will be hard to make are the pre amps for each channel bcs I'll have to match the impedance's and the whole circuit can be quite hard to make
Even though I've already started experimenting with pre amps
 

Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
Some of you asked the main goal for that console and i think its better to post it here:

For start i want sth simple lets say 6 to 8 channels 6 XLR together with TRS or TS inputs and 2 Auxiliary inputs (with RCA Connector)

Stereo channel to control each output independently

1 VU monitor for all the channels

2 monitor outputs with XLR or TRS connector

One EQ an the final output stage of the console like most low budget consoles

I think the mute buttons are the easiest ones because you just don't feed the signal to the main output

A tone control in every channel like all budget consoles have
I saw a schematic in circuitlib
https://www.circuitlib.com/index.php/projects/product/25-3-way-tone-control/category_pathway-29

I have no idea how to match the input and output impedances so i will probably need some help on that

I've already started experiment with OpAmps as pre amplifiers for RCA and XLR(I'll finish with XLR probably today) the gain adjustment and the volume controlled with a fader and then feed the signal to an amplifier

And no I'm not planning any Bluetooth connection or Sth like that
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,510
I think that one of the first things that will be hard to make are the pre amps for each channel bcs I'll have to match the impedance's and the whole circuit can be quite hard to make
Even though I've already started experimenting with pre amps
Good mic preamps will be most important feature, and the hardest to design.
If you really want to learn from the experience, then design yourself a transistor preamp for the microphones.
This is my favourite (attached below)

Some people prefer FET inputs, https://www.linearsystems.com/lsdata/datasheets/Copy_LSK389.pdf

I would recommend that you read http://www.douglas-self.com/ampins/books/ssad3.htm
Here is an overview or mic preamps: http://www.thatcorp.com/datashts/AES129_Designing_Mic_Preamps.pdf

If you just want to use an IC to get the job done then the best was the SSM2017
https://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/obsolete-data-sheets/139484016SSM2017.pdf
and I've no idea why Analog Devices made it obsolete. However Texas make a version which is pretty good:
https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina217.pdf
 

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Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
Are you planning on building everything from scratch or will you include some pre-assembled circuit modules?
Idk yet
I want to build most of them from scratch but if i find a specific circuit complicated
I may buy a pre assembled module
I want most of them from scratch bcs in the future ill be customize it and gain knowledge
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,485
If I were to do this I would use a modular approach since each channel is the same. Then you can add more channels as required.

I would make each channel into a skinny vertical module that plugs into a crate that supplies power and summing into the final output module.

Something like this:

1654367431282.png
 

bassbindevil

Joined Jan 23, 2014
457
Might be better to buy a used mixer and fix or modify it. Old unpopular (or unfamiliar/rare) brands can sell for much less than the parts are worth.

Or, start by making a very minimal console, like a portable unit for video shoots.
 

Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
Good mic preamps will be most important feature, and the hardest to design.
If you really want to learn from the experience, then design yourself a transistor preamp for the microphones.
This is my favourite (attached below)

Some people prefer FET inputs, https://www.linearsystems.com/lsdata/datasheets/Copy_LSK389.pdf

I would recommend that you read http://www.douglas-self.com/ampins/books/ssad3.htm
Here is an overview or mic preamps: http://www.thatcorp.com/datashts/AES129_Designing_Mic_Preamps.pdf

If you just want to use an IC to get the job done then the best was the SSM2017
https://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/obsolete-data-sheets/139484016SSM2017.pdf
and I've no idea why Analog Devices made it obsolete. However Texas make a version which is pretty good:
https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina217.pdf
One thing i haven't understood
Let's say I'm making a good pre amp for mic inputs
If i plug in that input s guitar signal coming from a DI-Box would it sound correctly? Because of all the impedance matching
Bcs if not i would need a generic purpose pre amplifier
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,510
One thing i haven't understood
Let's say I'm making a good pre amp for mic inputs
If i plug in that input s guitar signal coming from a DI-Box would it sound correctly? Because of all the impedance matching
Bcs if not i would need a generic purpose pre amplifier
Maybe. . .
Firstly, there's no impedance matching on audio. The days of a 600Ω output driving a 600Ω input with the associated 6dB attenuation are long gone.
Microphone have a source impedance between 50Ω and 1k, and microphone input impedances are generally 10k or 22k
Some DI boxes have line level outputs, some have attenuators to give a mic-level output.
If your mic input has variable gain, its lowest gain setting would probably work with a DI box. Many mixing desks have a switched attenuator on the microphone input to cope with line-level inputs.
Alternatively, you could incorporate a switched jack which would connect to the input of the next stage (generally the eq) and switch out the microphone preamp stage.
 

Thread Starter

nt2ds

Joined Jun 2, 2022
15
Good mic preamps will be most important feature, and the hardest to design.
If you really want to learn from the experience, then design yourself a transistor preamp for the microphones.
This is my favourite (attached below)

Some people prefer FET inputs, https://www.linearsystems.com/lsdata/datasheets/Copy_LSK389.pdf

I would recommend that you read http://www.douglas-self.com/ampins/books/ssad3.htm
Here is an overview or mic preamps: http://www.thatcorp.com/datashts/AES129_Designing_Mic_Preamps.pdf

If you just want to use an IC to get the job done then the best was the SSM2017
https://www.analog.com/media/en/technical-documentation/obsolete-data-sheets/139484016SSM2017.pdf
and I've no idea why Analog Devices made it obsolete. However Texas make a version which is pretty good:
https://www.ti.com/lit/ds/symlink/ina217.pdf
what OpAmp would you recommend buying in order to follow this PDF
http://www.thatcorp.com/datashts/AES129_Designing_Mic_Preamps.pdf
i am asking this bcs i saw that its not as the usual ones bcs they have a gain control input and output
except if, it doesnt matter and i just make the feedback connection with a potentiometer to the inverting input
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,510
The ICs on pages 1-23 are instrumentation amplifiers such as SSM2017/SSM2019/INA217/THAT1510/THAT1512.
Pages 24 onwards show you how to make an instrumentation amplifier out of an ordinary op-amp and a few transistors.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
26,485
As Ian said, you don't match impedance with equal values.
You match impedance as follows: the load impedance must be greater than the source impedance.
In general practice, make the load impedance 10 times higher than the source impedance. This avoids loading down the source.

For example, if the source has an output impedance of 600Ω, the input impedance of the receiving circuit should be 6kΩ or higher.

For op-amp selection, I would choose dual op-amps in an 8-pin DIP package. Use 8-pin DIP sockets which would allow you to easily change ICs when required.

opamp_DIP8.jpg

The pin-out of dual op-amp in an 8-pin DIP is pretty much standard.

1654429776930.png

First off the list of recommendations are:

JRC4558
NE5532
TL072

Reference: https://www.cycfi.com/projects/six-pack/op-amp-shootout/
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
5,510
According to Douglas Self, "there is probably no music on the planet that has not passed through a hundred or more 5532s on its way to the consumer".
He said that a while ago: if it was recorded more recently, then it has passed through one or two and a DSP chip
 

bassbindevil

Joined Jan 23, 2014
457
I'm fond of the AD712, but I can't actually justify that, except maybe Walt Jung said nice things about it in his book "Audio Ic Op-Amp Applications". The TL074 was used in one of the most revered DJ mixers, the UREI 1620.
 
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