Solder wire covered by silver

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,260
A silver bearing eutectic alloy like this one will do quite well.

But don’t just bridge the wires with solder, be sure to have them overlap enough to make a wire-to-wire joint with the solder.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,260
with this one i'm able to solder on ground that is covered by silver? just to apply this silver soldering wire?
That alloy will makes a good solder joint with silver of any sort. Even lead-tin eutectic alloy (63Pb/37Sn) would work well. The only reason to use the silver bearing solder is so the conductivity of the joint more closely matches the silver plating that is there to deal with inductance at high frequencies.
 

Thread Starter

scorpion1618

Joined Aug 1, 2022
4
That alloy will makes a good solder joint with silver of any sort. Even lead-tin eutectic alloy (63Pb/37Sn) would work well. The only reason to use the silver bearing solder is so the conductivity of the joint more closely matches the silver plating that is there to deal with inductance at high frequencies.
thanks a lot!!! i'm ordering this soldering wire and i will tray a soon as possible. thank you man
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,260
as you can see in photo, in my case one wire is disconnected from their ground. when i try to solder it again using normal soldering iron and wire, it's impossible because the solder won't applied to ground and it becomes like a ball
The photo isn’t very clear, the angle makes it hard to distinguish the wires but I originally thought the top set of wires were broken in half. If they aren’t then my comment is superfluous.

In any case, are you using lead free solder? That would make soldering very difficult.

Either way you need a good, no clean flux as well as a good alloy. Kester no clean flux would be fine.
 

Alec_t

Joined Sep 17, 2013
13,041
It is unlikely that the 'silver' you see is actually elemental silver. More likely it's solder or plated tin (or aluminium, as mentioned above). There may also be a transparent protective layer over the joint area.
A common problem with trying to solder to a ground point is the large heat capacity of that ground, which sucks heat away from the solder/joint.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,686
as you can see in photo, in my case one wire is disconnected from their ground. when i try to solder it again using normal soldering iron and wire, it's impossible because the solder won't applied to ground and it becomes like a ball
What it looks like to me is that the case (ground) is cast aluminum, not normally able to be soldered with regular solder and flux. Also, as already stated, the aluminum is a good heat conductor and thus it is not likely that any soldering without a much greater heat delivery solder tool will even be possible. I have used some flux that allowed soldering directly to aluminum, the package had a serious warning that the fumes from the flux were very toxic and it should only be used with adequate ventilation. So I did that soldering outside, standing upwind of my work.
One choice that can work is to first solder or weld a thin copper strip to the aluminum and then solder to that.

Is this for a repair? Or is it a start for production? If it is production then the design engineers need to be involved, because it is a problem.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,260
If they are aluminum wires or another metal spot welded to aluminum you can't solder them at all. Th photo doesn't really show one way or the other but the appearance of the lead to pad connection does look like it could be welded.
 
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