Protecting IP: trademark, copywriter or parent?

Thread Starter

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,415
I have a patentable software system, implementing an application specific proprietary language (animatronic control w/ simulated AI).

It’s copyrighted with statements in all modules. I wanted to patent or trademark the process and/or language.

I started the trademark application with the US government. I started there because my resources are limited and I thought it would be less expensive. Until I received an email asking for $1,000 or more!

Any advise on a cost effective strategy to protect my IP?
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,843
Well as you may know, it’s registration of the trademark that carries a fee. You get to use the circle-R in exchange, instead of a mere “tm”. The latter tells the world that you care about your trademark. The registration takes that up a notch.

You can claim copyrights for free by merely saying so. The best deal you’ll ever get!

What concerns me is your claim of a “patentable software system”. That’d be great if it’s true but I’m skeptical. Nothing personal, but I suggest the input of a patent attorney in the software arena. You might even get opinions for free.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
15,143
On a limited budget -- there is no easy and satisfactory answer. Lancaster makes the case that what you should do is publish it. Put it in the public domain to establish yourself as an expert and use your reputation to land lucrative gigs from the folks who will pay for a steady stream of new and creative ideas. You can't monetize a single idea unless you are willing to start an enterprise, make as much money as you can, and exit when the copycats with deep pockets show up.

Trust me. The other ways you are considering are the road to perdition.

P.S. I have two patents, and neither one is worth a brass farthing.
 

Thread Starter

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
7,415
Well as you may know, it’s registration of the trademark that carries a fee. You get to use the circle-R in exchange, instead of a mere “tm”. The latter tells the world that you care about your trademark. The registration takes that up a notch.

You can claim copyrights for free by merely saying so. The best deal you’ll ever get!

What concerns me is your claim of a “patentable software system”. That’d be great if it’s true but I’m skeptical. Nothing personal, but I suggest the input of a patent attorney in the software arena. You might even get opinions for free.
My best friend has a software patent, so through him, I have an idea of the process. Plus, I’ve discussed this with a patent and IP attorney.

On a limited budget -- there is no easy and satisfactory answer. Lancaster makes the case that what you should do is publish it. Put it in the public domain to establish yourself as an expert and use your reputation to land lucrative gigs from the folks who will pay for a steady stream of new and creative ideas. You can't monetize a single idea unless you are willing to start an enterprise, make as much money as you can, and exit when the copycats with deep pockets show up.
[\QUOTE]

The whole point is to delay any copycats. The process has a very small audience.

Trust me. The other ways you are considering are the road to perdition.

P.S. I have two patents, and neither one is worth a brass farthing.
Thanks for your observation
 
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