power regulator choice

Thread Starter

hamsli

Joined Feb 8, 2022
11
"Hello everyone, I'm new to the field of PCB design. I'm working on a circuit to recharge a Li-ion battery. I want to charge this battery with a voltage of 4.1V and 3A. I want to use the MP2393GTL-Z regulator for this. My input voltage source is a stabilized power supply that provides 24V. Below is a screenshot of the setup I've made, but I don't think it's correct. If you could help me correct it, I would appreciate it, and Thank you all for any help


Capture d’écran (138).png
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
34,386
Read this about how to charge a Li-Ion battery.
Then you will see why your circuit is not sufficient, and likely dangerous, to charge your battery.
 

Thread Starter

hamsli

Joined Feb 8, 2022
11
A voltage regulator alone isn't sufficient for charging Li-ion batteries safely.

https://batteryuniversity.com/article/bu-409-charging-lithium-ion

Once you study the problem more thoroughly, you'll come to the conclusion that buying a commercial solution will be less work and cost.
"I know that using only a regulator to charge a battery is not sufficient. I will use a microcontroller to regulate the charge. My problem lies in choosing the resistors and capacitors for the regulator. I have done my best to choose the values based on the datasheet, but I am absolutely sure that what I have done is not correct. I want to achieve a stable voltage of 4.1 V and a current of 3 A from a 24 V input voltage."
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
4,052
Are You sure that your Battery can withstand 3-Amps without fear of overheating ?

If You would like maximum Battery-Life-Expectancy,
You would be much better-off regulating the Voltage to somewhere between 3.8 and 4-Volts.

I would use your existing Switch-Mode-Regulator to drop the 24V Supply-Voltage down to ~5 or ~6-Volts,
then run that into a Linear-Regulator that has a Current-Limiting-Function,
like the MIC5158YN
.
.
.
 

Attachments

Thread Starter

hamsli

Joined Feb 8, 2022
11
ok i will
Please re-format your schematic into a less jumbled arrangement?
Please re-format your schematic into a less jumbled arrangement?
Okay, I will rearrange this circuit to make it clearer, and I would like to have your choice of passive components that would meet my operating conditions. This is for a final year project, and it would help me a lot
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
21,217
Not much of an improvement. If you still have text and symbols on top of each other then you have only made a half vast attempt at rectifying the problem. Did you ever learn anything about creating a proper schematic diagram? Your knowledge of the subject appears fatally deficient.
 

Thread Starter

hamsli

Joined Feb 8, 2022
11
"I found another IC from the same manufacturer, but it operates on 23V instead of 24V. I corrected my circuit based on the typical schematic from the datasheet, which takes 23V and outputs 3.3V. So, I calculated the resistance values for the feedback voltage divider and used the other components from the second circuit, and here is the result. I hope this circuit is clearer. The second IC is the MP2307
."Capture d’écran (145).png
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
21,217
"I found another IC from the same manufacturer, but it operates on 23V instead of 24V. I corrected my circuit based on the typical schematic from the datasheet, which takes 23V and outputs 3.3V. So, I calculated the resistance values for the feedback voltage divider and used the other components from the second circuit, and here is the result. I hope this circuit is clearer. The second IC is the MP2307
."View attachment 316937
No not really, it looks like the same mess that you originally presented. What is the point of throwing another variation into the mix?
 
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