Power and Signal connector

Thread Starter

Warlockgoosy

Joined May 19, 2021
7
I have been working on a PCB which requires a single connector(port) for input voltages 24V, 5V and needs to accommodate signal lines such as CANH, CANL and couple other GPIOs as well. What would be the best way to accomplish it.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
23,791
Depending on the 24v, 5v, current, it could be attained by IDC.
Or similar connector, otherwise screw termination block.
Search Digikey for something suitable.
They have Hundreds.
 
one of the things you should look at is whether or not live insertions are possible. There are connectors that can stagger the connections. In the latter case, you have make before break connections for individual pins. The other terminology is "hot swap"/
 

Ian0

Joined Aug 7, 2020
3,493
Is this connector inside a product, where it will be connected by the manufacturer?
Or is it external to the product, and will be connected by the user?
Do you expect the user to have any technical ability?

For the first case, nothing to beat the standard 2.54mm or 3.96mm header, as everyone else has said.
If the user has to connect to it, the D connector is good, because it protects the cables, but does require a user that can solder (I note that CAN is typically connected using a 9-pin D-connector)
If it has to be connected by an electrician, then your only choices are screw terminals and spring terminals. The green plug-in screw terminals are available in sizes that an electrician's screwdriver will fit into!
 

Thread Starter

Warlockgoosy

Joined May 19, 2021
7
Is this connector inside a product, where it will be connected by the manufacturer?
Or is it external to the product, and will be connected by the user?
Do you expect the user to have any technical ability?

For the first case, nothing to beat the standard 2.54mm or 3.96mm header, as everyone else has said.
If the user has to connect to it, the D connector is good, because it protects the cables, but does require a user that can solder (I note that CAN is typically connected using a 9-pin D-connector)
If it has to be connected by an electrician, then your only choices are screw terminals and spring terminals. The green plug-in screw terminals are available in sizes that an electrician's screwdriver will fit into!
The PCB will treated as a compartment and will be connected by the user. So I would like to have a single port connector, that anybody can use. Also, the PCB will have stopped motor drivers, so current consumption will be slightly high too.
 

Deleted member 115935

Joined Dec 31, 1969
0
What connector to use is a constant engineering challenge,
there are as you have seen just so many options and things to consider.

Assuming there is no "standard" you need to conform to.

First question is function,
a connector inside a box for home use, is going to be much less rugged than one that is outside, can be driven over etc.

second is the conectability .
do you want a PCB mount connector,
or a wire mounted one,
or a system to go between the two
do you want solder, screw, crimp ?

Third is then capability
Can the contacts take the current / voltage / frequency range I want,

Last , is practicality
some are only available in bulk orders, or need expensive tools to assemble,

I'd start by looking at other boards around, that have similar finctions.
 
Top