Please help me desolder charging port of smartphone

Thread Starter

disturbed123

Joined Jun 11, 2020
86
hi there.
i apply even 400 Celsius temperature from the heat gun from soldering station but the socket is not going out.
Please tell me some hint about that. Some boards ports are difficult(actually imposible for me) to remove.

Thanks in advance
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,689
Post a picture of what you're trying to remove.

I've found that applying a bit of solder with lead makes it easier to melt unleaded solder. Hobbyists can still use leaded solder in the US.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,883
Without knowing all you've done so far, my approach would be to wick out the solder from those four heavy tabs first. Then there's a good chance the leads of the charging port will come out easily - even with just a soldering iron.

Some boards (I doubt a phone will) have a ground plane or power plane (or both) which can require a lot of heat. You may have to heat a large area just to get the solder to give up the ghost. But without removing the solder from the four corners we can't be sure if it's swaged in (tabs bent to hold it in place).
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
14,689
maybe adding some special flux or do i know...
crop1b.jpgcrop1a.jpg
Flux might help with heat transfer from an iron, but will have little effect with a hot air tool.

Do you have a soldering iron and a solder sucker? I'd remove as much solder as possible with a solder sucker and break the ground tabs free (gently) with a pry tool. Keep alternately applying and removing solder until you can pry them free from the pads. If you have trouble getting the solder to melt, apply some solder with lead and try again.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,008
The stuff I mention in this older post would do the job. It's almost miraculous.

Just be aware to use very little, Snip off a piece about 2mm long and put it next to the terminal, then heat the solder on the pad and push the desoldering alloy on to the heated solder (it does not have to be melted).

The melting point is reduced so low you have a long time to extract the part.

NOTE: After removal be sure to clean the solder pads and via with a very small brush and/or solder wick, removing as much of the teated solder as possible, if there is any substantial residue you will have a heck of a time soldering the new part on.

After you've cleaned the solder pads, clean the iron tip. It is better not to use the brains wool or sponge you normally use to avoid contamination.

This stuff works really well, and it worth the trouble.

If you can't or don't want to get the alloy, a very similar idea (as @dl324 mentioned) is to add a bit of 60/40 alloy solder to the existing lead free solder to lower the melting point, this can help a lot too—though nothing like the specialist alloy where the part will just fall off.
 

Thread Starter

disturbed123

Joined Jun 11, 2020
86
as usual i am kinda confused after reading a lot of text. My heavy desoldering pump is somewhere in my apartment and that`s why i ordered new one from Ali express today. i have desoldering wire but am not sure if that will help for removing solder from the 4 places. i have added that solder for trying making me easy to remove. if i understand right you offer me to add a little 60/40 to the five pins, right ?
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,008
as usual i am kinda confused after reading a lot of text. My heavy desoldering pump is somewhere in my apartment and that`s why i ordered new one from Ali express today. i have desoldering wire but am not sure if that will help for removing solder from the 4 places. i have added that solder for trying making me easy to remove. if i understand right you offer me to add a little 60/40 to the five pins, right ?
Don’t do anything unless you have desoldering braid or a solder sucker. You must removed the solder from the pins to re,ove it, unless you use the product I mentioned above. You will not be able to remove the connector with just a soldering iron no matter what you do.

Get some good desoldering braid if you don’t want to buy the solder removal alloy I mentioned (it‘s described in the link in my first post). You will damage the PCB if you keep trying with only an iron.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,883
Cutting up the connector shell using a Dremel tool and abrasive discs might make it possible to remove the connector one section at a time.
That is IF he wants to remove the connector in favor of putting a different connector in its place. But my initial thought was that he wanted to remove the connector and keep it in tact. Not sure that's right - but that's what my thinking is.
 

Ya’akov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
6,008
That is IF he wants to remove the connector in favor of putting a different connector in its place. But my initial thought was that he wanted to remove the connector and keep it in tact. Not sure that's right - but that's what my thinking is.
Desperate times, etc.; but doing it right is much better of course. Hot air should work but since it hasn’t my concern is overheating the board. Time for braid or something ease effective, I think.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,883
Ya’akov I agree. Too many thermal cycles can damage the board itself. Let alone nearby components.

On another thread - The Right To Repair - I agree, we should have that right. But a point raised in that thread was if we use inferior components that lead to a catastrophic failure, should the manufacturer be held responsible? The same would apply to use of improper technique to repair. A hammer and chisel would certainly remove the connector, but - - - .

Use the right tools and technique to remove the connector. If you're still not able to safely and reliably remove it without damaging the board or nearby components then it may be time to find someone who specializes in that process.
 

Thread Starter

disturbed123

Joined Jun 11, 2020
86
Use the right tools and technique to remove the connector. If you're still not able to safely and reliably remove it without damaging the board or nearby components then it may be time to find someone who specializes in that process.
i think i am not stupid and if there s youtube videos and i have experience with soldering/desoldering i should find a way. thats why i am asking here for hint :) if i bring devices needed servicing to another person that`s waste of time and money. i should make 1001 tryings to say "thats not for me"
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
6,883
i think i am not stupid
My apologies if you took it as if I were suggesting you're not intelligent enough for the task. I'm certainly intelligent enough, but lack the proper equipment for such an endeavor. But if it's something I'm going to do repeatedly for years to come then investing in the necessary tools makes sense. But for a one-off job, it may be practical to bring it to someone else who, if they screw it up, can be responsible for replacing the damaged equipment. If YOU damage it - you foot the bill entirely.

Please don't think I'm assuming you're lacking in intelligence (I hesitate to use the S word). Just that if you've tried a number of times unsuccessfully then either you have the wrong tools or there's something about the assembly process you don't know. Perhaps the connector is glued down to the board for greater strength against accidental damage. That was one of my earliest thoughts though I didn't say anything before. Having worked in the electronics manufacturing sector for over 30 years - I've seen many things. Components like resistors, caps and such glued to the underside of a board then populated on the top side before running through the reflow oven - components don't fall off from the bottom. Perhaps your connector is also glued to the board.

I respect your intelligence and desire to do a job yourself. I'm a lot like you. I could buy - but why? When I can repair or replace something. And I've done exactly that. An amplifier had a bridge rectifier go bad. I replaced it with a larger and higher rated BR. Why? Because I had one on hand and there was room for it. Kudos to you for doing your own repairs.
 

Thread Starter

disturbed123

Joined Jun 11, 2020
86
the tools are present. i even have not cheap osciloscope which i have used only couple of times.

the port is not glued. i think there are some assumption :
i should be patient while heating and have to wait enough
the temperature is lower than needed
something should be added to 5 pins for the port to fall off.

// bad weather + no clients is bad combination ...
 

MrAl

Joined Jun 17, 2014
9,158
Hi,

If you have a part with multiple pins regardless what kind of part it is you have to heat up all the pins at the same time to remove it all in one shot. If you cant do that, you can cut the pins one by one then desolder each pin one at a time and remove them one at a time.
What you cant do is heat up some of the pins and try to pull the part off because the pins that are not heated will still hold it fast to the board making it too hard to remove.

One caution though regardless how you do it is you have to be VERY careful for two main reasons.
1. You have to be careful that the solder is fully melted or else you could pull a trace right off the board.
2. You have to make sure the solder is melted enough so a pin is not hard to pull out or else it could pull the plated through hole plating right out of the hole and that could be the end of that board and device.

To repair a board with a trace pulled off you have to use very fine wire and run it where the trace was.
To repair a plated through hole you have to push a thin wire through the hole before you put a pin from the new replacement part through that hole, and solder on both sides of the board. This works for double sided boards, but if you have a multi layer board (like so many are today) you may never get it to work again because it is hard to get the thin wire to connect to the sub layer copper traces because you dont have direct access to them. This means you have to be VERY careful when you remove pins. This means the best way is always to cut the old part off by cutting all the pins, then carefully unsolder one pin at a time.

Alternately, bring it to a cell phone repair shop near you.

Good luck with it.
 
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