Normal to include a resistor to anticipate diode leakage?

Thread Starter

MikeJacobs

Joined Dec 7, 2019
95
Just a hypothetical here.

Say you are anticipating a reasonable amount of leakage reverse current through a diode.
Would it be appropriate to put a resistor in (like a pull down of sorts) to bring the leakage to ground?
It would have to be a large resistor as to not affect the forward characteristics

What is a typical way to deal with leakage current?
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
19,911
Just a hypothetical here.

Say you are anticipating a reasonable amount of leakage reverse current through a diode.
Would it be appropriate to put a resistor in (like a pull down of sorts) to bring the leakage to ground?
It would have to be a large resistor as to not affect the forward characteristics

What is a typical way to deal with leakage current?
Leakage current means a large finite resistance.
There is no practical way to reduce leakage current.

Can you show an example of a circuit that suffers from leakage current?
 

Thread Starter

MikeJacobs

Joined Dec 7, 2019
95
Obviously is application specific but your saying just make sure your circuit can tolerate the reverse leakage current

I am seeing leakage currents of a few hundred micro amps

so, riddle me this

you have choice on diodes because of other various restrictions
Your circuit can’t take the few hundred micro amps
What do you do then?
 

Thread Starter

MikeJacobs

Joined Dec 7, 2019
95
How about giving us some specifics rather than vague hypotheticals and generalities?

Which diode? What circuit? Give us part numbers and a schematic and stop expecting us to play Twenty Questions with you. This is getting tiresome.
There is no circuit no part numbers and no schematic
This is simple book knowledge question
I am taking an electronic class at a community college and these questions the teacher can not answer

Simply asking a question on how leakage current is handled if your circuit can not accept it
 

OBW0549

Joined Mar 2, 2015
3,135
There is no circuit no part numbers and no schematic
I figured as much.
Simply asking a question on how leakage current is handled if your circuit can not accept it
There is no general answer to that question, which is why your instructor can't answer it. The question is so general, in fact, that it is nonsensical. How to deal with leaky diodes is something that's specific to a particular circuit; there is no general technique.
 
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