Newbie-Which training kits are the best-

Thread Starter

Chris English

Joined May 1, 2019
2
Hello,

Researching- new to electronics which is a better training set /kit

Maxitronix Labs or Arduino ? or a combination of both ?


Thanks


SB
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,760
That would depend on what you are interested in learning.

Arduino-based kits offer a way to learn to interface computers to the real world with sensors and actuators.

Maxitronix Labs kits are focused on circuits.

While the former includes circuits and the opportunity to investigate them as much as you want, the latter is much more limited. On the other hand, if the focus of a learning kit is circuits, you will learn more about them naturally.
 

Thread Starter

Chris English

Joined May 1, 2019
2
So would learning circuits first make learning about Arduino-based kits easier later on?

My interest is open-ended. Although I am the definition of a beginner in electronics.

Thanks for answering-
 

shteii01

Joined Feb 19, 2010
4,644
Arduino website has basic examples of various things you can do. Don't buy anything, just read through the examples and see if they interest you or give you ideas/guidance on how to do whatever is germinating in your head: https://www.arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/BuiltInExamples

For example, Arduino boards are not used for audio amplifiers. So. If you want to build a basic audio amplifier (usually one or two transistor circuit), then you want more circuit oriented material.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
3,760
So would learning circuits first make learning about Arduino-based kits easier later on?

My interest is open-ended. Although I am the definition of a beginner in electronics.

Thanks for answering-
I think you need to gauge your interest by thinking about the kinds of things you can imagine yourself building. If you want to build things that use MCUs (microprocessors, like the Arduino), then starting with the Arduino is a good choice. Nothing stops you from learning and building circuits that interface the sensors and actuators to the MCU.

If you are mostly interested in creating stand alone circuits, the Arduino will offer less.

Be aware, this is a complex and iterative process. Learning "electronics" can be compared to learning "science". There are many topics that fit under that rubric, and you could start anywhere but still need to learn math and physics common to all the branches. In this way, circuits, which are common to all electronics, is a natural requirement no matter how you begin so use your own natural interest in this or that sort of "electronics" to judge.

Don't start out theoretical, start out by playing around with things you find fun, then digging into things you don't quite understand. You will, on your own, find the parts you have to bang your head against to understand and you'll do it so you can make the things you want to see become real.

If, in the other hand, you are actually interested in the theory of electronics, that's a different story. Something in the middle for that would be to start with a book: The Art of Electronics, amazingly, available free in PDF form.

This is a classic and very well written practical text that uses only a little math and talks about how to get things done. It's extensive, and not light reading but will teach you a lot if you slog through it.

It is worth having in any case.

If I was to make a blind suggestion, I would say: start with the Arduino kit, but don't gloss over the circuit parts. Build cool and fun stuff, and try to improve the circuit parts of them, making changes using your own ideas and working out how with help from here and the book.

Also, buy and build simple kits and work out how their circuits operate. It will give you mechanical and mental skills you will find invaluable.

Good luck, and you will find plenty of help here.
 
Top