need help on some easy-hard electronic problems

Thread Starter

nomans10224

Joined Mar 2, 2017
7
hey guys, a dear friend is in need of your helps about some problems... his an EE as i am, we both have backgrounds on this type of topic but i cant recall it anymore. he needs to answer it tonight because he has an interview tomorrow thanks for your help.. there are still more problems ill send it after u guys reply thanks again
 

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Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,988
serious in what?
Needing help with answering those questions. Let me rephrase the first question. If there is no current flowing in a resistor, because there is no complete circuit, then according to Ohm's Law, what is the only possible voltage across that resistor?
 

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,751
Welcome to AAC .
Are you serious !!!!!!!!!!!! ? o_O:eek::eek::eek:
EE Engineers ???? :confused::confused::confused:

You don't recall those simple circuits..?
How did you became an EE ?
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,015
It says "pre-screen", maybe it's to weed out those who have a BS, and those who are full of BS?

I keep looking at it, thinking there must be a trick somewhere, a real question that I'm not seeing?
 

Thread Starter

nomans10224

Joined Mar 2, 2017
7
an EE is different from ECE.. its been years since ive taken this subject btw, i just need to be sure about the answers i give him because his future depends on it..
 

Thread Starter

nomans10224

Joined Mar 2, 2017
7
so in number 2.. the diode is in reverse bias right? so if i recall reverse bias act as no connection???????? so the values are both 0.. im sorry if im a dumb EE, i specialize in high voltage, distribution, machine operation and some other useless stuff.. ive taken this electonics subj in my college days and i barely accurately recall all the theories and formulas thats why im asking here.. it look obvious to you guys cause your all good at this.. maybe im in the wrong group. SORRY
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
16,988
an EE is different from ECE.. its been years since ive taken this subject btw, i just need to be sure about the answers i give him because his future depends on it..
If you and your friend have a wobbly and uncertain grasp of the basics, your future in industry will not be your major problem.
 

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,015
Yes you are correct for number 2, both answers are 0.

Actually, if they want the voltage relative ground they're going to need a ground symbol on the schematic, else the circuit is floating. Maybe he'll get bonus points for pointing that out? ;)
 
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