My 30w square wave lighting inverter design, 12v to 220v.

Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
42
recommended 5a fuse, Switch between battery and circuit. Warning high voltage. tested and working, still got to do long term tests to do.

Relatively simple , easy to fix, working on a pcb, where instead of the two mosfets, theirs two 3 pin terminal blocks, so the mosfets can be easily taken out and replaced, also decreases the price of the overall circuit admitting the fets. its not the most efficient but factoring the price saved for thinner wires, the reusing of the same components, fingers crossed 3x10w bulbs (3x75w incandescent equivalent) & i can fix it myself . i dont think its completely terrible. one caveat "cav-eee-art" you do need a 12-0-12 transformer, 3a about 13 British paso's

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please feel free to drop a recommendation or comment. circuit & bom attached

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oz93666

Joined Sep 7, 2010
694
So I guess your power source is a 12V battery ... You have gone to quiet some trouble ( and obviously have great electronics skill) to build this circuit to ramp 12V up to 220V AC and this feeds two led mains lights which have internal circuitry which turns the 220V back into low voltage DC to drive the leds.....

Someone with less electronics know how would just have bought 12V led lights that connect direct to the battery , no electricity losses heating up circuitry , no subliminal flicker , and much cheaper.
 

Thread Starter

RIKRIK

Joined Oct 11, 2019
42
thank-you for you reply. The led's are there just to show the oscillator going back and forth , in the schematic it shows a terminal block labeled 12-0-12 for a transformer to be connected up.

I would argue that like all designs theirs pros and cons, The circuit is based on one of the most popular designs to build a inverter, the original circuit is shown below. Also a few ic based versions struggle to keep a stable frequency over nominal battery voltages.

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The cost, okay you got me beat on efficiency, but 30w @ 12v is 2.5a , 30w@240v is 136ma (excluding loss's) . So theirs the wire cost , also over in the uk, 12v bulbs are still quite expensive £6 for a 5w version. £1 for a 220v 10w. Then theirs the loss's in wire length, so its mainly down to the application and how much loss you are willing to sacrifice for the simplicity of the circuit. if it breaks and i can easily fix it or pop into the shop and pick up a new £1 bulb. So for me, im okay with that.

Kind regards,
Rik
 
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