Motor +generator schematics?

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Steven Rice

Joined Mar 5, 2021
13
Hello, my name is Steven Rice. I am just trying to figure out the proper schematics for a circuit that has a DC motor, and a DC generator that is used to power the motor, and anything else that it can handle. I believe that it would need to have a resistor, or potentiometer, between the motor and the generator. I would like to ask for a professional drawing of the schematics I should use?
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,671
Is this an existing one, or one you are designing?
If existing, give the info on the motor and generator, type etc. And also the end use.
Max.
 

Thread Starter

Steven Rice

Joined Mar 5, 2021
13
Is this an existing one, or one you are designing?
If existing, give the info on the motor and generator, type etc. And also the end use.
Max.
It's one that is beginning to be designed. I think I might be just using a 5V DC motor. I have an idea for a generator that might be able to provide power to a lot more than the motor. I'm not looking for exact specs on the resistor. That will probably be changed multiple times

I'm just hoping that I will have no problem with hooking up the motor straight to the generator with a resistor and a switch or two?
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,671
Another (larger)DC motor can be used as the generator.
The motor rpm will depend on the supply (generated) voltage and the load.
A resistor is not an efficient means of control.
Max.
 

strantor

Joined Oct 3, 2010
5,508
Am interpreting correctly that you want the motor to turn the generator, and the voltage output from the generator will power the motor?
 

Thread Starter

Steven Rice

Joined Mar 5, 2021
13
Yes, it seems like you are interpreting some of it correctly. The motor will be turning the generator. I think that I won't be able to use a single resistor for control over the motor speed. I will definitely try to use a potentiometer. But, the potentiometer will be in the parallel circuit of the generator output to the motor input. I will probably have to have an LED in series with the generator output to make sure that it's producing properly.

Really, no one here has any idea of the schematics I should use?
 
A generator which powers a motor which drives said generator [ad infinitum] is a classic attempt at an over-unity/perpetual energy machine.

Thousands of people have tried it. None have succeeded in outsmarting the laws of thermodynamics.

Discussion of free energy machines is not allowed.
 
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Thread Starter

Steven Rice

Joined Mar 5, 2021
13
A generator which powers a motor which drives said generator [ad infinitum] is a classic attempt at an over-unity/perpetual energy machine.

Thousands of people have tried it. None have succeeded in outsmarting the laws of thermodynamics.

Discussion of free energy machines is not allowed.
I think I understand what you mean. It will be a free energy machine. But, it won't be a perpetual motion machine that will run forever, because magnets don't last forever.

But, my idea for a new kind of DC generator, might change the world. I don't think that anyone has ever tried this specific design before. I purposely searched YouTube for it, to see if someone else had tried it, and I saw a bunch of free energy videos. But, none of them matched my design.

You know what, guys. We should close this topic. No one gave me the answer I was looking for. But, you all asked so many questions about it, I think I personally figured it out. I will probably just parallel the motor and the generator, with the potentiometer in series with the motor. And, I will have a resistor and LED parallel with the generator, to see if it is truly generating power. I think the potentiometer in series is the answer. I just asked here, in case someone thought that I would need to use a resistive capacitive circuit for some reason.

Thank you all anyway, but, I feel like I have more electronic engineering experience than most of you. Case closed. Bye.
 

atferrari

Joined Jan 6, 2004
4,245
Your level of electronic engineering experience is denoted by the questions you posted.

By now, not a schematic but a block diagram (with all parts mentioned by you) is actually needed to show you where your idea seems close to flawed if I read it right.

Two things come to mind:

Life is not fair.

Be ready to answer questions along the journey.
 

Thread Starter

Steven Rice

Joined Mar 5, 2021
13
Your level of electronic engineering experience is denoted by the questions you posted.

By now, not a schematic but a block diagram (with all parts mentioned by you) is actually needed to show you where your idea seems close to flawed if I read it right.

Two things come to mind:

Life is not fair.

Be ready to answer questions along the journey.
I completely agree with you there. Life is definitely not fair. Because, in 2012, I was riding a motorcycle and I was almost killed by a 91 year old lady. If you want to read about it, you can go to this site =
hyper text transfer protocol://play(dot)google(dot)com/store/books/details?id=S3qLBAAAQBAJ

You will learn how I used to build elevators. That's where I got my engineering experience.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
26,775
I feel like I have more electronic engineering experience than most of you
Because we tell you the truth about the basic laws of physics and getting more power than you put into a system doesn't work?
There is someone here who lacks electronic engineering experience but it's not one of us.
 

dendad

Joined Feb 20, 2016
3,788
Okay. I will definitely bookmark this thread. And, I will be sure to keep you posted on the patent I will be getting.
It is like jumping off a cliff here on Earth, with no device to save you , like a parachute or hang glider. No updraft or any external thing like that. You will fall.
But, along come this guy who says, "If you wear a blue shirt, you will float."
The folks here are saying, "Don't jump as you will fall. It does not matter what colour your shirt is!"
The same applies to the motor/generator idea. It cannot work without an external power input, no matter what you think. It just can't!
To Quote Scotty, "Ya canna change the laws of physics!"
And it is probably a good think, else thermal runaway would cook us all.
 

Reloadron

Joined Jan 15, 2015
5,888
You will never get out more than you put in. There are motor generators though not as popular as they once were. Commonly called a "dynamotor" or simply motor generator. I worked with some very large motor generators and amplidynes during my career.
Think about something. Motors and generators both give off heat and both have friction. That amounts to loss making neither 100% efficient and you are looking for something in excess of 100% efficient. All of this has been tried and the basic rules of physics always trump out. Best of luck with your proof of concept.

Ron
 
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