Medical news...

Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,880
About a couple of years ago, I adjusted my eating habits a little bit. I was having dinner between 9:30 and 10:30 pm, and then went to sleep at about 12:00 am ... a really bad schedule health-wise, I know...

Then I got fed up (no pun intended) with my disorderly way of having meals and did some adjustments which, fortunately, I've been sticking to and haven't slipped yet. I now have dinner at 7:30 pm, and go to bed at about 10:30 or 11:00 pm tops ... I've been slowly but steadily losing weight ever since.



While popular healthy diet mantras advise against midnight snacking, few studies have comprehensively investigated the simultaneous effects of late eating on the three main players in body weight regulation and thus obesity risk: regulation of calorie intake, the number of calories you burn, and molecular changes in fat tissue. A new study provides experimental evidence that late eating causes decreased energy expenditure, increased hunger, and changes in fat tissue that combined may increase obesity risk.
 
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WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
27,863
The article makes it sound like this is some brand-new, trailblazing, flawless procedure out of the UK's NHS. Yet, while they've recently treated six patients, it's been being used in the U.S. for well over a year in studies at several universities and places like the Mayo Clinic and it is available to anyone, albeit as an experimental procedure and thereby usually not covered by insurance. While it has a lot of potential for use in low- and moderate-risk cancer patients, it sounds like it's not likely to be a good option for high-risk patients. Also, cancers recur in about 20% of patients that undergo the procedure.
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
2,597
article makes it sound like this is some brand-new, trailblazing, flawless procedure out of the UK's NHS.
Did you expect more from a father-son school project website that recompiles articles from other websites?
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Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,880
Good news.
Mosquitos are the most dangerous creatures on earth, if you go by the number of humans killed.
They are indeed ... and it makes me wonder about the level of their usefulness, evolutionary-wise. I mean, a population completely shielded from disease becomes weak with time. And a minor infection could wipe it out because it neve had the chance to strengthen its immune system.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
31,112
it makes me wonder about the level of their usefulness, evolutionary-wise.
Evolution is not interested in usefulness, only survival.
The fact the mosquitos carry disease is incidental to their survival, and may actually reduce it if the diseases they carry kill off too many of their hosts.
 

Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,880

The new therapy aims to increase the level of T-cells in patients’ bodies to better allow them to spot the disease. The researchers achieved this by examining patient's blood for the rare T-cells that already had receptors which could sniff out their cancer. They then turned their attention to other T-cells that could not find the cancer and redesigned them to make them adept at this task.
 

Thread Starter

cmartinez

Joined Jan 17, 2007
7,880

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,484
I don't know what Nano-Knife is but I've had the Cyberknife treatment for prostate cancer ~10 years ago and still getting almost nil results yearly on my PSA tests now where they had climbed over 7 before. 4 gold target beads inserted into my prostate. MRI and CAT scans programmed into the robotic control computer and operational results fed into a robotic arm with a gamma beam knife. Form fitted to a bed to be placed on the robotic arm table to insure proper and repeatable positioning. Then only 5 30-minute sessions of very precise tight beam gamma radiation by the robotic arm. The only side-effect was some nerve damage causing discomfort urinating which I've come to ignore. Compared to what guys with untreatable prostate cancer, surgery, or nuclear bombardment go through the side effects are nothing. Was a fairly new procedure when I had it done but very pleased with the results so far. Only downside was that they missed seeing the cancer in my left kidney in the MRIs and CAT scans which was visible but I guess the Oncologist was more interested in my prostate and didn't see the big picture. Luckily it was caught on an abdominal ultrasound a few years later before it metastasized although it did require removing my kidney.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,484
I wonder if this is Nature protecting itself:
It's Global Warming!!!! The human testes reside outside the body for cooling because normal body temperature is detrimental to sperm production! Add global warming to the mix and Voila! reduced sperm count because the testes are too HOT! LOL
 

MrSalts

Joined Apr 2, 2020
2,597
I don't know what Nano-Knife is but I've had the Cyberknife treatment for prostate cancer ~10 years ago and still getting almost nil results yearly on my PSA tests now where they had climbed over 7 before. 4 gold target beads inserted into my prostate. MRI and CAT scans programmed into the robotic control computer and operational results fed into a robotic arm with a gamma beam knife. Form fitted to a bed to be placed on the robotic arm table to insure proper and repeatable positioning. Then only 5 30-minute sessions of very precise tight beam gamma radiation by the robotic arm. The only side-effect was some nerve damage causing discomfort urinating which I've come to ignore. Compared to what guys with untreatable prostate cancer, surgery, or nuclear bombardment go through the side effects are nothing. Was a fairly new procedure when I had it done but very pleased with the results so far. Only downside was that they missed seeing the cancer in my left kidney in the MRIs and CAT scans which was visible but I guess the Oncologist was more interested in my prostate and didn't see the big picture. Luckily it was caught on an abdominal ultrasound a few years later before it metastasized although it did require removing my kidney.
Good thing you didn't donate a kidney to anyone before that happened. Otherwise, there was a 50/50 chance the person who was so grateful to get a kidney would have got your cancer.

Also, super smart of you not to donate a kidney to anyone after the cancer.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,484
The one left is stage 3 for kidney disease so I'm not quite out of the woods yet although no dialysis. Cousin my age had his kidney transplant donated from his sister ~50 years ago. Lifetime of taking horribly expensive antirejection meds (can't afford to retire and lose his insurance benefit) and never really knowing if or when rejection could happen. Not an especially great way to live but never slowed Chuck down from finishing college, marriage, teaching college, coaching football, and pandering to the grandkids!
 
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