Logic integrated circuits functional equivalents.

Thread Starter

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
985
I've been laid up for a while with a dislocated knee, (my 70th birthday present, I don't like this "growing old")
What I am looking for is a comprehensive list of logic i.c functional equivalents, i.e a 4024 is the same function as a 74HC4024, but i'm having trouble comparing SN74******** with say motorola's i.c's. I don't mean just direct replacements, although that would be handy, and am not concerned so much with the different classes of evolution, such as interfacing, working voltages etc.
Trolling through manufacturers data sheets to find for instance, different Hex inverters, or divide by 10 BCD up-down counters, is laborious to say the least, and so many are now obsolete and data unavailable.
Now I know that many would say "why bother" but I run a small club where most of the members are disadvantaged in one way of another and find electronics therapeutic. In the last few months, we have been lucky enough to have received donations of components from several sources which include many dozens of logic i.c's from different series.
There is no need for the latest processor controlled designs, just as much fun is had by them building circuits found in older publications.
My career in electronics was mostly spent in analogue and R.F design and latterly servicing of consumer electronics. I did not become as well versed in all the logic i.c family's as I would have liked so any help would be appreciated.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
10,507
I don't know if this is what yo are asking, but it is a little trick I learned from a surplus dealer. Say you have a CD4077 (XNOR). The Motorola equivalent is MC14077. That is, if you have a Motorola chip remove the "1" and see if that gives an equivalent.
 

Thread Starter

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
985
I don't know if this is what yo are asking, but it is a little trick I learned from a surplus dealer. Say you have a CD4077 (XNOR). The Motorola equivalent is MC14077. That is, if you have a Motorola chip remove the "1" and see if that gives an equivalent.
Yes, thank you, that is exactly what I meant. I have been reading dozens of articles describing the different families and how to use them, but nothing as you have described.
 

ebp

Joined Feb 8, 2018
2,332
If you get stuck for data, by all means post a request. I, and I suspect several others at ACC, have data for logic devices back to the dawn of time.

Motorola always had a bit of a tendency to go its own way with part numbers and package designations.

Something I noticed on a 4000 series part just a few days ago when someone here was trying to use one of the oscillator-counter chips - the current part (don't remember mfr, but not many are making 4000 now - probably not TI since the TI datasheets are poor quality copies of ancient RCA sheets) was much faster than the original part of the same number. This was just a "standard" 4000 part, not an HC or AC version. I have no idea if this is a common feature of current parts. It might lead to some issues if you try to use old parts in a recent design.

"... in one way of another and find electronics therapeutic."

I quit doing electronics in part because I got to the point where all it did was aggravate me.
 

Thread Starter

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
985
If you get stuck for data, by all means post a request. I, and I suspect several others at ACC, have data for logic devices back to the dawn of time.

Motorola always had a bit of a tendency to go its own way with part numbers and package designations.

Something I noticed on a 4000 series part just a few days ago when someone here was trying to use one of the oscillator-counter chips - the current part (don't remember mfr, but not many are making 4000 now - probably not TI since the TI datasheets are poor quality copies of ancient RCA sheets) was much faster than the original part of the same number. This was just a "standard" 4000 part, not an HC or AC version. I have no idea if this is a common feature of current parts. It might lead to some issues if you try to use old parts in a recent design.

"... in one way of another and find electronics therapeutic."

I quit doing electronics in part because I got to the point where all it did was aggravate me.
euphoria and frustration, the emotions you get with electronics and also being a musician.
 

RichardO

Joined May 4, 2013
2,271
Motorola always had a bit of a tendency to go its own way with part numbers and package designations.
The reason Motorola added the "1" in front of the 4000 series part number is that they already had a 4000 series of part numbers.

For instance the Motorola MC4024 was a dual VCO and an MC4044 was a phase comparator. Bad things happened when an MC4024 was plugged into a CD4024 socket. I am sure it happened a lot. :eek:
 

ArakelTheDragon

Joined Nov 18, 2016
1,350
Just write the old name (4024) and you will get the new name and manufacturer. Confirm it is the same IC and that is it. Use "google.com" and not "bing.com", as bing gives the british " if, maybe, should, will, might", at the end 50 pages of nothing. Or just put the old name at "tme.eu" and see the results.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,887
What I am looking for is a comprehensive list of logic i.c functional equivalents, i.e a 4024 is the same function as a 74HC4024, but i'm having trouble comparing SN74******** with say motorola's i.c's.
Things have gotten unnecessarily complicated in this regard.

Some manufacturers (e.g. Motorola/Onsemi) make CMOS equivalents of TTL circuits. For example, there are TTL counters such as 74160 and Motorola made a CMOS part MC14160B with the same functionality and pinout.

Toshiba has a part labeled KS74HCTLS540. I have some, but haven't found a datasheet, so I don't know if it's HCT or LS; but it can't be both. HCT has TTL inputs and CMOS outputs, obviously LS has TTL inputs and outputs.

If you "grew up" using TTL and early CD4xxx, you'll be able to recognize when a "CMOS" part is functionally equivalent to a TTL part.

Looking at my Jameco catalog, I see that TI makes a part called CD74HC4017E which is an HC equivalent of CD4017 (so they put as many letters in the part number as they possibly could). But using CD and HC in the same part number is confusing. HC generally has more drive strength than CD. When both are in a part number, which takes precedence?

There are some cases where there's a CD4xxx equivalent of a TTL part, but they chose to not "tie" them, e.g. CD4503 and SN74LS367. Same pinout, same functionality.

There are no comprehensive lists. I've built up my mental list by having used the parts.
 
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