Inductor vs Solenoid vs electromagnet

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by leodavinci90, Nov 27, 2018.

  1. leodavinci90

    Thread Starter Member

    Oct 22, 2014
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    4
    So,
    If we start learning about inductance, we term any coil of wire an inductor but later on we term them electromagnets. What is the basis for this terminology, namely, are inductors a category/type of electromagnets? and how about solenoids do they all fall under electromagnets?
     
  2. oz93666

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 7, 2010
    578
    124
    A coil of wire does have an inductance, but then so does a strait wire ....coiling the wire is a means of increasing inductance of the same length of wire ... So technically it's better to say a coil has an inductance.

    A solenoid is a type of electromagnet that causes mechanical movement when the current is applied , for example a relay .
     
  3. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    2,412
    Doesn't Google know the answers to your questions?
     
  4. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    18,899
    6,053
    It is the other way around.

    A solenoid is a type of electromagnet which are all types of coils which are all inductors.
    The difference is in the material used for the core of the coil, the material around which the coil of wire is wound.
    The material of the core is classified by its magnetic permeability and whether it exhibits ferromagnetism or some other type of magnetism.

    Reference:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferromagnetism
     
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