I can't seem to find this Resistor

Thread Starter

Ernst Eiswürfel

Joined Oct 29, 2018
16
I have a garage door and the controller board had a few dead components that i replaced, but the only one part is difficult to find bc it's dead and i cant measure it, is this a "10 kOhm 1W" resistor or a "10 Ohm 1W" or is it a really different one?.

resistor.jpg
 

BobaMosfet

Joined Jul 1, 2009
2,000
I have a garage door and the controller board had a few dead components that i replaced, but the only one part is difficult to find bc it's dead and i cant measure it, is this a "10 kOhm 1W" resistor or a "10 Ohm 1W" or is it a really different one?.

View attachment 269912
That is a 'Sandstone' Resistor. 10K-Ohm, 1 Watt. It is unlikely that it has failed, you could simply remove it from the board and re-use it, or even us a DMM on it to measure it to be sure it's 10K and not 0.1-Ohm. there are also 10K, 1W Resistors in more common packages now, too. If you go that route, you might get 'flameproof' to eliminate possibility of that kind of issue.

Also, you can get an assortment here at Electronic Goldmine, that might have the same value for $5.00:

https://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=G16188A
 
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Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
10,361
R10 is a 0.1 ohm 10% 1W , i would say its a current sense resistor for the motor.
Take a bigger picture of the pcb.
 
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Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
4,794
It shows 10 K 1W, not 10k, 1W.

K means an accuracy of 10%. J would be an accuracy of 5%. The resistor is 10 ohms, 10%, 1W.
Think about it. To produce 1W in a 10,000 ohms resistor, the voltage across it needs to be 100V. Lots of wasted voltage.
A 10 ohm power resistor can be used to limit or sense current of up to 0.315A, dropping 1V.
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
10,096
But it actually says “R10”, so I’d say it was 0.1Ω. K is 10% tolerance.
Yeah, but you're across the pond. Here in the colonies that nomenclature is less common.

Still, the space between 10 and K makes me think you stumbled into correctness.

ak

To the TS: Make and model number of the opener? Also, country of purchase?
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,168
actually don't remember seeing resistor made in USA in long time
to make it 10 Ohm it should be written "10R K 1W".
to me "R10 K 1W" looks like 0.1 Ohm, 10% 1W.

definitely not 10k
 
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Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
4,794
I have never written 0.1 ohms as R1 and it measures as "nothing" so it must be 0.1 ohms and is made where the letter "R" is never pronounced
and they drive their "cause" on the wrong side of the "oad". We drive our cars on the right side of the road.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,168
the value will depend on application and circuit design. any value is possible. an easy way to know more is to measure it. also posting full image of front and back of the PCB would be helpful, as well as name plate of the device and used motor. typical opener is maybe 1/2HP and powered by 120VC in North America and some 230V in the rest of the world (judging by topic starter handle name, he is in Europe). that means currents up to some 3A are expected. that is in the neighborhood of what 1W resistor of 0.1 Ohm is rated for. it is possible that is is used to detect overload condition.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,402
It does indeed not seem likely that a 10K ohm resistor will fail do to excess current. It might fail due to internal corrosion, though. But ant 10K resistor with that wattage or higher will work.
Are you sure that your ohm meter is working correctly? What does the meter read? Also, if you are probing the leads above the board the connection may not be adequate. You can simply replace it with two half watt 4.7 K resistors in series.Or two 5.1 K half watt resistors in series. That would be close enough.
 
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