How to Increase or Multiply AC Current with constant Voltage

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Lido, Apr 14, 2015.

  1. Lido

    Thread Starter New Member

    Apr 14, 2015
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    Hi guys i just want to know how to increase AC Current (I) with constant voltage 230V
    it has to take low input and produce high output ..Ex : 10 amp input -20 amp output
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    16,958
    2,957
    Hello,

    You can never increase the power without adding power.
    When you use a transformer the 230 Volts at 10 Amp can become 115 Volts at 20 Amp max.

    Bertus
     
  3. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    Rather weird question .!!:confused:
     
  4. cmartinez

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 17, 2007
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    And I'm still looking for a unicorn...
     
  5. RRITESH KAKKAR

    Senior Member

    Jun 29, 2010
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    Hello,
    I have done Voltage Multiplier in AC which multiply the input voltages .
    No idea how you want to incraese current
     
  6. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
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    You first need to rescind the law of conservation of energy, the first law of thermodynamics and likely some more. Good luck on that.
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Use the 10 amps to start the motor on your gasoline powered generator and have it generate 20 amps.
     
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  8. phiguy

    New Member

    Mar 7, 2016
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    Uhhhhh... I KNOW PPL WILL ARGUE, BUT I WOULD TRY RESONANCE. A LITTLE LONG LOST TECHNIQUE BY A FELLOW NAMED, T E S L A. AKA THE WIZARD OF MENLOW.... SPIN THE AC MOTOR PM W/DC MOTOR. 9VOLT BATTERY=71volts on my device... good luck. & ignore ppl just REPEAT what they read n hear. Experiments=truth! :)
     
  9. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Welcome to AAC!
    You're going to have a problem with the law of conservation of energy.
     
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    I guess if you're working on breaking the laws of thermodynamics it doesn't matter whether you know the difference between Tesla and Edison.:D
     
  11. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    The thread starter stated no interest in boosting voltage, which would be better done with a transformer than a motor turning a generator. He requested a current boost - doubling - at constant voltage, which would require creation of energy, which is categorically impossible per the laws of thermodynamics.

    I'm quite certain you have no experimental data refuting the laws of thermodynamics. No one does.
     
  12. AnalogKid

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 1, 2013
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    Beat me by 12 (!!!) minutes.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
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  13. AnalogKid

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 1, 2013
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    That is not how electric power conversion works, and cannot be done as you describe. In electric circuits, power equals voltage times current, or P = V x I. There is no device that can take in 2300 W at its input and produce 4600 W at its output unless it has another input, a power source to run the amplifier. The power put out by any device, from the smallest LED to rock concert amps to cars to jet engines to the largest nuclear power plant, cannot be greater than the power inputs, and in fact always must be less.

    ak
     
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  14. BR-549

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    You might try a 230 V square wave instead of sine, if load can take it.
     
  15. R!f@@

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 2, 2009
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    I said a weird question and now there is a weird answer.
     
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