How to fix circuit board for wireless garage door opener

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,633
That tiny module might be able to deliver the same functionality, but if it arrives like the little modules that I ordered for a similar price, you get no hint as to the connections at all. And it has no power supply at all. The broken circuit board has one fast-on connection and a 4 position pin connector, and LEDs indicating two different supply voltages. So you will need to be able to understand the circuit of the system that you are hoping to install it in and make some adaptions. You will also need to create an interface to the rest of the system, because the small device on ebay does not appear to have a mechanical relay, which provides a lot of isolation.

So the short answer to your question: "Will it work with my old garage opener?" is "YES, BUT....."
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,019
It is not perfectly clear it has momentary operation option, due to the 'Chinglish' translation, just shoot a question to the seller to confirm.
Most of them do, as they all seem to use standard circuitry.
Your old system would normally have an extra - logic board? does it?
IOW, what energises/turns on the motor.
Max.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,633
It is not perfectly clear it has momentary operation option, due to the 'Chinglish' translation, just shoot a question to the seller to confirm.
Most of them do, as they all seem to use standard circuitry.
Your old system would normally have an extra - logic board? does it?
IOW, what energises/turns on the motor.
Max.
Good point, Max.
Changing the receiver will require interfacing an unknown module with circuits that we have no clues about. That seems to be a lot more cost and effort that replacing a broken crystal. Of course this all presumes that the intention is simply restoring a garage door remote opener system to operation, and that there are no other issues to address. I have, in my physical archives, an older CB frequency opener receiver that has 3 terminals, antenna, and pushbutton circuit. It would be powered by the 24 volts across the button circuit and have enough stored power to continue working while momentarily shorting those 2 terminals. Quite an achievement, really.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,019
Most use a single pulse (on/off) into the logic board, the board, the board is then responsible for the sequential logic, Up-Stop-Down etc. blockage while moving, motor switching etc.
If so I cannot see why the relay output module cannot be used, particularly if the present set up also has the single P.B. - manual input for local control.
Max.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,633
Most use a single pulse (on/off) into the logic board, the board, the board is then responsible for the sequential logic, Up-Stop-Down etc. blockage while moving, motor switching etc.
If so I cannot see why the relay output module cannot be used, particularly if the present set up also has the single P.B. - manual input for local control.
Max.
Yes, the controls board has a microprocessor and a whole lot of logic, MUCH UNLIKE the older systems. And if the rest of the system matches the vintage of the receiver then the logic may all be mechanical. The last 3 openers that I looked at the receiver was a small section of the single board, most of which was logic.
 

Thread Starter

kje

Joined May 6, 2012
27
Thank you!!

On my new Wireless-Remote-Control board I have No and Com (and + and - to power). Where do I connect No and Com to the garage opener circuit board? Here is a picture of the circuit board for the garage opener. There is 4 pins:
1) NF
2) +5V
3)

20200115_114110.jpg
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,633
If there was an external button available the two pins will connect in parallel to the button connections. I am presuming that the older receiver was separate from the door driver assembly and that there were terminals for both power out to the receiver and connections for that button.
I do not recall any mention of the connections to the failed receiver.
And like a lot of those good ideas, that new device comes with no information at all. That is mostly how it works.
 

Thread Starter

kje

Joined May 6, 2012
27
Here is a picture of the hole circuit board of the garage opener if that helps? The circuit board for my old remote control was connected to the pins in the red circle. Can I connect the new circuit board here?
20200115_161549.jpg
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,633
The first step is simple and safe, which is to connect wires to those 2 pins and verify that a momentary connection between the two opens and closes the garage door. If it does, then you are all set to connect the two to the new receiver terminals that you described earlier.
 

Thread Starter

kje

Joined May 6, 2012
27
I tried but nothing happend. The garage door is opening when I manually press the button on the garage opener in the roof. How is it possible to get this remote to work?

Maybe I can solder it to the garage opener button in the red circle?

20200117_211000.jpg
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,633
Examine the traces on the circuit board that connect to that button and see what terminals they go to. That is one way. Or use an ohm meter to discover which terminals they pushbutton contacts connect to.
 
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