How can a AC source be regulated to specific DC?

Thread Starter

AERoBro

Joined Mar 25, 2020
6
Currently I am trying to power an Arduino project with a mechanical battery. I am using a stepper motor (NEMA23) as generator for it only needs low RPM to reach full potential (Around 600 RPM). Output of the stepper was determined at 1.8A AC @ 33V. This should be enough power for all the components. However, I am unable to regulate the voltage to do this.
The following components need to be powered:
- Arduino Uno with servo motor (9g) attached
- CNC shield with 2 stepper motors (NEMA17) attached

A schematic view of the system is found in the attachment.

What components do I need to regulate the power to be able to make this work? I hope this is possible.
 

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Thread Starter

AERoBro

Joined Mar 25, 2020
6
It will be a weight of around 80 kg that drops down 1.5 meters. A gear ratio of 45:1 will produce about 600 RPM.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,405
I assume you are relying on a unregulated repeatable drop rate?
I think I would have used a DC motor for this and a LM317 regulator.
Max.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,456
Currently I am trying to power an Arduino project with a mechanical battery. I am using a stepper motor (NEMA23) as generator for it only needs low RPM to reach full potential (Around 600 RPM). Output of the stepper was determined at 1.8A AC @ 33V. This should be enough power for all the components. However, I am unable to regulate the voltage to do this.
The following components need to be powered:
- Arduino Uno with servo motor (9g) attached
- CNC shield with 2 stepper motors (NEMA17) attached

A schematic view of the system is found in the attachment.

What components do I need to regulate the power to be able to make this work? I hope this is possible.
I don't think that components are the problem. I think this notion is speculative at best. The diagram is a childish attempt to convey what looks like information, but is completely devoid of content. You might as well ask for help in making a more convincing diagram.

If you said you were using a water wheel powered by the creek outside which dropped 12 feet over 600' I might be less dismissive.
 

Thread Starter

AERoBro

Joined Mar 25, 2020
6
I assume you are relying on a unregulated repeatable drop rate?
I think I would have used a DC motor for this and a LM317 regulator.
Max.
I am fairly new to electronics and I am not sure what you mean by unregulated repeatable drop rate. I will look furher into the DC generator, that seems a suitable alternative. Thank you for the advice!
 

Thread Starter

AERoBro

Joined Mar 25, 2020
6
I don't think that components are the problem. I think this notion is speculative at best. The diagram is a childish attempt to convey what looks like information, but is completely devoid of content. You might as well ask for help in making a more convincing diagram.

If you said you were using a water wheel powered by the creek outside which dropped 12 feet over 600' I might be less dismissive.
I am new to electronics and therefore not very experienced in making circuits. This was meant as a schematic, not as a circuit, therefore it does look childish. My goal is to visualise the relation between electric and mechanical energy. The mechanical source is a weight falling down. I am now stuggling to regulate the power output to make it suitable for the Arduino and shield that controls a miniature assembly line.
 
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