The difference between a regulated voltage source and a direct voltage source in simulation with Proteus

Thread Starter

R0UGHR1D3R

Joined Jul 14, 2020
44
Hello
As a part of project to simulate the Clancy's model of EMG insider circuit, I need to simulate this isolated power circuit as well.
But the problem is, there's no "7807" or any kind of fixed voltage regulator which provides 7v in output.
So I managed to use an adjustable voltage regulator, but somehow that didn't work too. (I can post the schematics if needed)

Is there a way to use a direct DC 7v instead of this circuit to provide the same output?!
Or maybe another circuit that does exactly the same as this circuit?!
IDK

Any type of help is appreciated.
Thanks in advance.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

Thread Starter

R0UGHR1D3R

Joined Jul 14, 2020
44
Hi
Lately I've posted another thread about this circuit and I've asked for help but nobody answered.
U can find it here.

Here's my question now: can I replace this whole circuit with two direct voltage source for +-7v outputs (like the one in generator mode list in Proteus) ?

Pls let me know if I've posted this thread in a wrong forum
Thanks in advance
 

Attachments

Last edited by a moderator:

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,711
There are quite a few simulation questions in the general electronics chat, but they would be just as appropriate here. The problem is that the question is confusing. Unless the regulators are being evaluated there is no reason to show them in a simulator circuit. Just use the theoretical perfect voltage source, unless you are needing to determine the response of regulators.
 

Audioguru again

Joined Oct 21, 2019
3,171
You did not post a link to the circuit that needs a positive +7.0000V supply and a negative -7.0000V supply for us to see why a +/- 9V supply won't work.
 

Thread Starter

R0UGHR1D3R

Joined Jul 14, 2020
44
There are quite a few simulation questions in the general electronics chat, but they would be just as appropriate here. The problem is that the question is confusing. Unless the regulators are being evaluated there is no reason to show them in a simulator circuit. Just use the theoretical perfect voltage source, unless you are needing to determine the response of regulators.
That's all I needed to do, and it worked!
Thanks :)
 

Thread Starter

R0UGHR1D3R

Joined Jul 14, 2020
44
You did not post a link to the circuit that needs a positive +7.0000V supply and a negative -7.0000V supply for us to see why a +/- 9V supply won't work.
Because in this circuit, the INPUT in 9-12v and the OUTPUT is +-7v.

Just imagine that I want to make this circuit work in Proteus, not for any other special reason or supplying any other circuit with it.

Also, I've solved it, thanks for your reply :)
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,711
Of course, in the real world having a voltage that accurately set is both very expensive and very very unlikely. And in most applications, rather un-needed. Given the difficulty and expense of such close control, most systems are designed to work with voltages within 3% of the nominal value.
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
9,244
Look into the LM317 and LM337. These are very easy to use and can be adjusted to +7 V and -7 V using the equation in the datasheet.

ak
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
9,244
Something up above must have been edited, cause I don't see any five digit numbers or anything that looks "very expensive."

Look into the LM317 and LM337. These are very easy to use and can be adjusted to +7 V and -7 V using the equation in the datasheet.

ak
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,711
OK, AG, I went back and it was not the TS referencing the 7.0000 volt supplies.
BUT for the purpose of a simulator why spend the effort to add a regulator? It is simulation, where power sources are perfectly stable and noise free, not like the real world.
 
Top