Gravitational waves confirmed...

Discussion in 'General Science' started by cmartinez, Feb 11, 2016.

  1. nsaspook

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  2. BR-549

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    Here's another description, not quite so technical.

    We need to get the third leg up. We need to be able to point to something. Focus.

    Something should be impressed on the source light. And if no source light, perhaps close by.
    Aren't most black holes supposed to be in the center of galaxies? Plenty of light there.

    I'm still skeptical.

    http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2016/jun/15/ligo-detects-second-black-
    hole-merger


    I forgot to mention, these results are stirring up the black hole community.
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2016
  3. hp1729

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    What am I missing? If we know that gravity exists why not assume gravity waves exist and interact? How much did this experiment cost us?
     
  4. joeyd999

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    This is actually an important result with respect to continued validation of Eisenstein's Theory of Relativity.

    One could, and some do, also assume gravitons exist. And there are on-going experiments to detect them. This, I believe, will be a waste of money.
     
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  5. BR-549

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    I don't think experiments should be done to prove something. They should be done to disprove something. But I am dielectric.

    Cern is a waste. An interferometer is not.

    I say add several more legs.

    The reason we look, is because we can't find them.
     
  6. hp1729

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    How much do we need to spend to prove gravity exists?
     
  7. nsaspook

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  8. cmartinez

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    That, I think, is science's greatest tragedy... one's an idiot until proven otherwise, and not the other way around.
    And yet, that's also the most reliable path to truth...
    Sad indeed for those lacking in perseverance
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2016
  9. #12

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    You know there are a million wrong ideas floating around, and that's only counting the Internet!
    Somebody here regularly says, "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary proof."
    Sometimes that happens.
    All I can say is that this space-time thing really stretches my imagination.
    And gravity stretches space-time?
    Matter and energy can be interchanged?
    Space and time are a function of each other?
    This is not the kind of stuff that mixes well with beer.
     
  10. nsaspook

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    https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/press-release-gw170104

     
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  11. cmartinez

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    3.5 billion light years away... We supposedly have around 400 billion stars in the Milky Way, and yet the scientists are not optimistic about witnessing a black hole merger event, or neutron star collision in our neighborhood anytime soon... it tells you something about the rarity of these things...
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2017
  12. nsaspook

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    http://www.nature.com/news/rumours-swell-over-new-kind-of-gravitational-wave-sighting-1.22482
     
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  13. Janis59

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    Gravitation anyway is the very intriguing force in the Nature. One my college from distant non-European nation was telling me fantastical story what happened at their Academy of Sciences Leading State Astronomical Observatory. When some years ago happened that all stars was just for the moment on one line in our Solar system, they begun to be ready for this for a long beforehand. They used all the resources to borrow the precision weight machines (scales) if they are digital, if they are accurate very much, and if they have functionality to be PC monitored. When that day and hour was there, logically, the more than dozen different weight readings indeed shown some micrograms mass shift for the short moment, when those planets was one-side of our planet. BUT....
    But all that happened roughly 8 minutes BEFORE that astronomical event was possible to see by their large array telescope....
    However there is nothing be curious, indeed in the formula of grand gravitational law, where You see any time-bound part? Nowhere, it means that gravitation is coming just flash-like, with infinite speed, whilst the light waves demand a 300 000 km/sec.
    Then I asked when and where I ought to look for their grand article on this topic, and said I hope they will be no doubt elected for Nobel prize. Instead they replied - <<no, there will be no any article at all, because we are living in the most hardest economy obstacles, but if we shall produce the furor, we shall loose even that financing what we have now. We not want to loss the main instrument in the region>>. Thus they asked me never to disclose what it was the nation, sorry.
    But hope the fact itself may be useful to push into some brain-crinkle.
     
  14. nsaspook

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    Maybe in a comic book it does. :rolleyes:

    Sure it's possible for gravity-waves to affect earth before the light-waves arrive. They both travel at the 'speed of light' in vacuum. Even deep space is not completely empty of matter with Interstellar Medium plasmas which slow electromagnetic waves by a media factor of refractive index vs vacuum. Gravity waves are not electromagnetic so (to the best of our current understanding) the media refractive index would be equal to vacuum. Over vast distances this difference could mean different arrival times.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
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  15. Janis59

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    RE:"" Over vast distances this difference could mean different arrival times""
    Eight MINUTES time-shift in so cosmologically small distances as Solar system nearest planets to us???
    I cant see any logic in Your words, except that PROBABLY this experiment may be reformulated that gravitational waves are travelling SEVERE MANY-FOLD faster than light waves.
    If not agree, where in the formula F=G*M*m/R^2 You see the any kind of the time constant??
     
  16. cmartinez

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    Have you considered that there might've been some sort of instrument malfunction or glitch in the event that you mentioned those scientists reported?
     
  17. nsaspook

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    Are you really going there, Newtonian 'infinite speed'? Really? We have the best evidence of gravitational waves speed consistent with Einstein's general principle of relativity that equates the numerical value of the ultimate speed of gravity to that of the speed of light from several experiments. I'll stick to GR today instead.

    http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/GR/grav_speed.html
     
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  18. cmartinez

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  19. Janis59

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    I may believe they was able to produce the mistake for 8 picoseconds but not for 8 minutes. That is a space industry world class monitoring station equipped to measure 100 000 km distances to satellites within 3 milimeters(!!) of accuracy. Picoseconds are their everyday bread. Okay, scales maybe was slightly less precise but even 8 seconds may not counterweight the 8 MINUTES !
    RE: NSA Spook - thanks for reference.
    CMartinez. Even more thanks for Yours reference
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
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