fix a washing machine with lid not closed error message

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
Do you think shorting the white wire will make below washing machine to work again or not ? And explain why. It reports an error that the lid is not closed. The circuit diagram is shown in the below url.
 

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drc_567

Joined Dec 29, 2008
782
... Suggest disconnecting the two white wires to the lid closure sensor. First, insure that the main power plug is disconnected. Then use a voltmeter with an ohms scale to check that there is a change in the sensor continuity as the lid lever is actuated. You should observe an on-off effect on the meter ohms scale.
 
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Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
... Suggest disconnecting the two white wires to the lid closure sensor. First, insure that the main power plug is disconnected. Then use a voltmeter with an ohms scale to check that there is a change in the sensor continuity as the lid lever is actuated. You should observe an on-off effect on the meter ohms scale.
Yes. the last time I assume the lid switch is faulty. This can help me to find out if the lid switch is faulty or not.
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
10,072
With the washer unplugged, actuate the switch while monitoring the resistance across the white wires. If resistance doesn't alternate between open and short, replace the switch. Would not recommend defeating any safety feature.

You seem to have posted two links to the same picture.
clipimage.jpg
 

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
... Suggest disconnecting the two white wires to the lid closure sensor. First, insure that the main power plug is disconnected. Then use a voltmeter with an ohms scale to check that there is a change in the sensor continuity as the lid lever is actuated. You should observe an on-off effect on the meter ohms scale.
I would like a quick way to start the machine spinning without replacing any faulty component.
 

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
Yes. the last time I assume the lid switch is faulty. This can help me to find out if the lid switch is faulty or not.
To my surprise, after I cut off the two white wires to the lid switch, a multimeter reports connected whether the lid is closed or not in this state of faulty condition. So I try two conditions, 1. shorting the two white wires and 2. breaking the two wires open. However, in these two conditions, the machine remains refuse to spin.
(the machine can wash, but refuse to spin after washing to dry off the clothes)
So any other methods suggested?
 
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Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
With the two white wires open or disconnected, are you able to check the actual resistance across the two sensor wires, using an ohm-meter? It may be that the circuit board requires a certain sensor resistance in order to operate. A possible 'good' sensor resistance might be a value that is something finite, neither zero nor extremely high ohms. Again, the sensor resistance should exhibit a noticeable change as the mechanical lid lever is flipped.
I have an image of the multimeter. But this meter is not reliable, so I can only show the value at continuity. The sensor resistance is as shown,whether the lid is open or closed(in this state of faulty condition).
 

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Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
So you suggest that the shorting should include a certain value of resistance.
That means I should add variable resistor so that I can test the value that will work?
How should I choose one?
 
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If there is no change in the sensor resistance as the mechanical lever is moved, then it may be necessary to replace the lid sensor in order to make the spin cycle operate. A possible source for a replacement sensor could be a used appliance store or repair shop.
 

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
If there is no change in the sensor resistance as the mechanical lever is moved, then it may be necessary to replace the lid sensor in order to make the spin cycle operate. A possible source for a replacement sensor could be a used appliance store or repair shop.
Replacing the sensor will mean I have to open the case of the washing machine, in which I have no understanding. I believe adding a variable resistor is the best way to go.

So we have a plan now for the time being.
 
There are certain logic chips that require a step shift in voltage levels in order to function. If you have a simple single pole, on-off type toggle switch, try connecting this between the two white wires. As the washer is turned on, try both switch positions, one at a time, to see what happens.
 

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
There are certain logic chips that require a step shift in voltage levels in order to function. If you have a simple single pole, on-off type toggle switch, try connecting this between the two white wires. As the washer is turned on, try both switch positions, one at a time, to see what happens.
So, this means toggle from on ( connected) between off ( disconnected) when the machine running and reports the error message "E03" instead of a finite resistor?

If in case it needs a finite resistor, what value you would expect to start with?
 

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
So it fills, agitates and does everything but spin? Then I'd say it's not the door sensor.
Everything fine except the spinning to dry out the clothes, and also before the second wash. It simplys stop at the error code"E03" , the doc says that the lid is not closed.
That spin very fast and that may require a caution /warning checking in this machine design, I believe.
Or else, what you can think of?
 

drc_567

Joined Dec 29, 2008
782
Try to reset the main board. Just unplug the washer from the wall for 5 minutes or so.
Temporarily short the two white wires together using a wire nut ... making a secure connection.
Plug the main power cord into the wall socket, switch the washer to 'ON' and see if the error code is present.
... Best guess is that no resistance is going to be in the lid sensor circuit ... That is, it will be just open or closed.
If no error code lights up, then an auxiliary switch may work ...
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
4,192
Mother-In-Law (MIL) had a new machine that she didn't use that often. Also didn't overload the machine. Within a year it quit spinning. The OBD (On Board Diagnostics) said it was a bad Mode Shift Coil (MSC). She called a repair man and he told her (told me too) that the whole mechanical assembly needed to be changed. The assembly cost $135.00 and labor could be anywhere from $300 to $400. It was at that point she decided to scrap the machine and buy another new machine. But I stopped her. Asked if I could tinker with it.

The MSC was at the very bottom of the machine and came off with just two bolts and a plug. So I removed it and bench tested it. Sure enough, it was dead open. Called a number of places and they all said the same thing - the MSC was not available and I'd have to purchase the whole mechanical assembly. NOT wanting to pull the tub out and off the shaft I decided to cut the MSC open. Two stamped rivets held the shell together. Upon opening it - the coil looked pristine. There was a fusible link. Checked that and it was open. The rest of the coil was fine. Did some math and determined that the fusible link was rated for 102% of normal expected operation. After searching on line I discovered that this model had experienced this failure a number of times. So I went to RadioShack and bought a new fusible link, one rated a little higher. 142% (I think it was) and installed it. The machine has been working for the past 5 or 6 years now with no problems.

Your issue doesn't sound like it's related to the door - even though the OBD is indicating a bad switch. I would suggest bench testing the switch to see if it's functioning. If so - then the problem may be on the board that senses the switch position. They're not like the old machines - a switch to apply power to a motor, but rather a switch to tell a computer what's going on.

A spinning tub is not something you want with the lid open. It's too easy to put your hand in and have it twisted off while spinning. That's why they stop so quickly when you open the door. Adults are smart enough to not put their hand in there but children might. That's why the safety requirement. At least that's what I think.

Recap: If the switch is functioning then it might be the board. Could be a loose plug, could be a bad solder joint or a failed component. Diagnosing the problem is the key.
 

Thread Starter

Leon_Chan

Joined Sep 11, 2019
37
Try to reset the main board. Just unplug the washer from the wall for 5 minutes or so.
Temporarily short the two white wires together using a wire nut ... making a secure connection.
Plug the main power cord into the wall socket, switch the washer to 'ON' and see if the error code is present.
... Best guess is that no resistance is going to be in the lid sensor circuit ... That is, it will be just open or closed.
If no error code lights up, then an auxiliary switch may work ...
No. I have tried to start it in two cases.
1. the white wires soldered together
2. the white wires break open
Both indicate E03 error when it should spin
 
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