ESP32 Controlled Motor (first circuit ever)

Thread Starter

ConnectedWeAre

Joined Oct 22, 2019
6
<first post>

Hi,

I am well-read on the subject, but no schooling and my only hands-on experience is a lot of soldering and a couple RPi tutorials. I'm designing an ESP32-controlled motor. It is essentially a drill powered by 2 separate 4xAA 6v battery banks to prevent any voltage drop problems. I'm planning on using h-bridge IR2302SPBF and voltage reg is LM2596. The motor is a tiny 6v N20 gear motor. And for what it's worth, I plan to use the touch sensors on the ESP32 for input.

If the power is connected like this and everything but he motor is directly connected to ground:
BATTERY#1 --> LM2596 to 3.3v --> ESP32 and IR2302SPBF
BATTERY#2 --> capacitor --> IR2302SPBF ==> MOTOR

Does this work? Do I need any other pieces? Do I not need any diodes or resistors anywhere?

I appreciate any advice.

Thanks,

Connect
 

Thread Starter

ConnectedWeAre

Joined Oct 22, 2019
6
Well that's disappointing. I explained how it worked and simply asked if the pieces fit together. I expected at least one person would be able to confirm that my facts were straight.

Instead of waiting, I found a YouTube that was very similar to my setup which gave me the confidence to continue. It worked fine. As it turns out, ESP32 is incredibly easy to program.

I am now on to the next project. I will post that in 5 minutes (or however long it takes to complete).

Also, I am looking for folks in the New York City or Saint Louis areas. I am willing to pay for consult and help. I have a lot of questions and ideas to build, and I need expertise in various machinery and electrical engineering. PM me for more information.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,536
Since you are just beginning it is very important that you understand why schematics are important.

Narrative descriptions don't allow an overview of the circuit and its connections, they are also prone to error. A person not actually working with the circuit you are describing will have a very hard time being sure what you mean by your description, but a schematic will tell them (and you!) exactly how things are put together.

Reading and drawing schematics is an essential skill for anyone serious about building electronics.

If you want help here, you will continue to be "disappointed" if you don't provide schematics, drawings, and photos as appropriate or requested by people trying to help. You may be willing to pay for help, but you are not paying here, and many people here aren't even slightly interested in your money, but will help if you make the effort to answer the questions asked, including requests for schematics and the like.

It's best to get off to a good start because this is a great resource if you do what you need to access it.
 

Thread Starter

ConnectedWeAre

Joined Oct 22, 2019
6
Since you are just beginning it is very important that you understand why schematics are important.

Narrative descriptions don't allow an overview of the circuit and its connections, they are also prone to error. A person not actually working with the circuit you are describing will have a very hard time being sure what you mean by your description, but a schematic will tell them (and you!) exactly how things are put together.

Reading and drawing schematics is an essential skill for anyone serious about building electronics.

If you want help here, you will continue to be "disappointed" if you don't provide schematics, drawings, and photos as appropriate or requested by people trying to help. You may be willing to pay for help, but you are not paying here, and many people here aren't even slightly interested in your money, but will help if you make the effort to answer the questions asked, including requests for schematics and the like.

It's best to get off to a good start because this is a great resource if you do what you need to access it.
I truly hope you are right. My next project and post has full pictures with color-coded wires. I literally did everything but solder. I get a little stage-fright when working with new devices. So I wanted to ask for advice before connecting anything.

In this post, all I wanted to know is "is it safe?"; yet all the answers are "18650 can false advertise". I get it.... but damn. Yes, the battery will take 50 hours to charge. I get it. The only thing I want to know is:

Could anybody suffer bodily harm if I connect the obvious pieces in the picture at the bottom of this post?

Connect
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,536
First of all, floating a lithium ion cell will kill it. Trickle charging works with NiMH or lead acid because of the their chemistry, and lithium doesn't share that attribute.

If you want to do what you are describing, you should get a BMS (Battery Management System) module. They are ubiquitous and cheap, and have dedicated circuitry to manage the charging.

So far as your direct question. There is nothing "obvious" about what you intend to connect to what from that photo, hence the request for a schematic. We can't read your mind, and you are right to be concerned about the potential for lithium cells to cause fires and harm. We are also concerned, so why would be provide an answer to an ambiguous question when it involves one?

No one is trying to give you a hard time, but no one wants to take responsibility for guessing what you mean, either.

Look into BMS modules, that's the right answer to the question you might not know to ask.
 
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