energy consumed by arduino (uno type)?

Ian Rogers

Joined Dec 12, 2012
784
What simulator? What components? If its just the Uno, there are many factors.. Pins high / low... Internal modules on / off.. Power mode...

If you just turn it on its about 42mA ( ish) so with a low input voltage of say 6v then power will be 1/4 of a watt. But that isn't even blinking light sketch...
 

Thread Starter

MAINAHNOUD

Joined Jul 24, 2019
60
What simulator? What components? If its just the Uno, there are many factors.. Pins high / low... Internal modules on / off.. Power mode...

If you just turn it on its about 42mA ( ish) so with a low input voltage of say 6v then power will be 1/4 of a watt. But that isn't even blinking light sketch...
This is my schematic so how can I alculated it?
 

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Ian Rogers

Joined Dec 12, 2012
784
Not sure... You can change the settings to run from a fixed power source ie separate 12v then power the arduino by changing its properties, but it would be quicker to build it for real..
 

Thread Starter

MAINAHNOUD

Joined Jul 24, 2019
60
Sorry I can't understand you. You tell me before that if only arduino in on state it consume 42mA*6v.

So what the next step?
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,056
Do you want to calculate only the arduino current, or is it to include the amplifiers, LED (which, incidentally should have a series resistor which will affect the current), and wherever the 2.5V comes from?
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
10,056
[QUOTE="AlbertHall,
Yes, only arduino current.
I don't understand what do you mean about 2.5v
Your circuit includes points maked 2.5V as a centre rail for the amplifiers.
As stated above the UNO draws quite a lot current as supplied. You can reduce this by removing the power on LED, and by using power down sleep mode as much as possible.
The arduino has a 5V regulator on board. If you supply Vin with 10V then half the power will be dissipated by that regulator dropping the 10V down to 5V. Much better to supply 5V to 5V pin using a switch mode regulator to get a regulated 5V from whatever your power supply is.
There are more advanced methods involving turning off functions which you are not using.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,055
Okay thank you.
Sorry can you tell me in steps how can I calculated the power consumption?
Not unless you let us know what you are using for a power supply and how it is connected to the Arduino and the rest of the circuits, and which model of Arduino you are using.. You also need to state what value resistor you plan on putting in series with the LED that is connected to pin 13, because it would be difficult to estimate the total current with a damaged output pin and a burned out LED.
Regards,
Keith.
 
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Thread Starter

MAINAHNOUD

Joined Jul 24, 2019
60
Not unless you let us know what you are using for a power supply and how it is connected to the Arduino and the rest of the circuits, and which model of Arduino you are using.. You also need to state what value resistor you plan on putting in series with the LED that is connected to pin 13, because it would be difficult to estimate the total current with a damaged output pin and a burned out LED.
Regards,
Keith.
I used 5v as power supply.
The model of arduino is uno r3.
The output which in circuit is led, I will remove it. So, assume that no led in out, just I need to see the output in oscilloscope.
 

andrewmm

Joined Feb 25, 2011
399
finding the power consumed by a processor to any degree of accuracy is very difficult for even the most experienced engineers.

The processor itself, will take different amounts of power , dependent upon what voltage it has, what speed you have it running at , and are you using sleep and what internal peripherals you are using how. a processor at idle is lower power than one doing lots of memory access. and this will change by the milli second,

The bits the processor is connected to , will take various amounts of power, again dependent upon speed / voltage and function, and this will change as the environment changes.

Your question is easy, the answer is very difficult.

As a bottom line, the Uno, is designed to run from the standard USB, which I think was 1/2 amp at 5v,

Does your simulation allow you to connect virtual oscilloscopes to see voltage against time ?
if so, put a 1/2 ohm resistor in series in the power line, and measure the voltage drop across it ,
that is assuming your simulator models this.
 
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