EMR DETECTED TL-PA9020P KIT INTERNET OVER POWERLINE

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ELECTRONICSQUESTIONS

Joined Feb 27, 2024
3
I have detected the following EMR readings coming from said devices;

13.5uA/m
4.8mV/m
0.353uW/cm2
3.016mA/m
1.165 V/m

The questions asked of TP-Link are as follows;
1. What components within the unit are emitting EMR?
2. Is it the broadcom BCM60500KFSBG chip?
3. Why are there wireless chips in the device? Is it so they can communicate with one another? And can the wireless function be turned off? And if not do you sell the same product that has no wireless chip/ function emitting EMR or if it does it can be permanently disabled?

They refuse to provide answers hence my post.

Attached is a picture of the internal electronics board. The chip with the grey material covering it is a Broadcom BCM60500KFSBG chip which I guess is the wireless chip.

I was of the assumption that the units communicated via the electrical wire only and had no wireless function however the EMR indicates otherwise, and that they may indeed communicate via a wireless chip.

Any help/ information will be much appreciated.

Thank you.
 

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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,284
I thought this forum was supposed to be populated by intelligent adults, it looks like I was mistaken...
Look, shielding is a perfectly acceptable way to reduce RF signals, on your head or on the device. Intelligent adults (including the people at TP-LINK) don't have IMO questionable fears about tiny levels of EMR on any electronic device.
Picking up small levels of RF fields in a powerline adapter does not mean it's really wireless, it means it's switching electrical energy at a rate that might produce (like from the BCM60500KFSBG network processing chip) some localized EM fields that might propagate some small distance.
https://techinfodepot.shoutwiki.com/wiki/TP-LINK_TL-PA9020P
 
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Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
21,225
I have detected the following EMR readings coming from said devices;

13.5uA/m
4.8mV/m
0.353uW/cm2
3.016mA/m
1.165 V/m

The questions asked of TP-Link are as follows;
1. What components within the unit are emitting EMR?
2. Is it the broadcom BCM60500KFSBG chip?
3. Why are there wireless chips in the device? Is it so they can communicate with one another? And can the wireless function be turned off? And if not do you sell the same product that has no wireless chip/ function emitting EMR or if it does it can be permanently disabled?

They refuse to provide answers hence my post.

Attached is a picture of the internal electronics board. The chip with the grey material covering it is a Broadcom BCM60500KFSBG chip which I guess is the wireless chip.

I was of the assumption that the units communicated via the electrical wire only and had no wireless function however the EMR indicates otherwise, and that they may indeed communicate via a wireless chip.

Any help/ information will be much appreciated.

Thank you.
Since datasheets are unavailable from the manufacturer, I'm guessing the chip is obsolete and no longer being supported. From what little I can surmise it is a broadband over powerline type device. BPL(Broadband over Power Line) was a fad in the early 2000's but was a colossal technical and public relations failure. The conventional wisdom is:

Success has many fathers,
But failure is an orphan.
Let us know if you are able to dig up more information. I do have one question for you.

Why is this important to you?
 

Externet

Joined Nov 29, 2005
2,221
It shouldn't be but there are people making money on this radiation fear, selling meters, detectors, books and just making up stuff to keep the money rolling in.
And they all still fill their houses with more and more WiFi crap they cannot live without to feed their comfort. Who needs the clotheswasher telling it's done on internet email ?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,522
I do not send anything "private"over wireless connections. I am fully aware of exactly how "private" wireless communication is NOT. Funny how folks believed that the first few generations of cell phones were somehow private. Certainly they were more secure than CB radio, (that is supposed to be funny!). But for some reason I could hear them on my Radio Shack scanner that did not tune those frequencies. Not sure exactly how that worked. The scanner was not modified at all.
 

Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
11,303
I have detected the following EMR readings coming from said devices;

13.5uA/m
4.8mV/m
0.353uW/cm2
3.016mA/m
1.165 V/m

The questions asked of TP-Link are as follows;
1. What components within the unit are emitting EMR?
2. Is it the broadcom BCM60500KFSBG chip?
3. Why are there wireless chips in the device? Is it so they can communicate with one another? And can the wireless function be turned off? And if not do you sell the same product that has no wireless chip/ function emitting EMR or if it does it can be permanently disabled?

They refuse to provide answers hence my post.

Attached is a picture of the internal electronics board. The chip with the grey material covering it is a Broadcom BCM60500KFSBG chip which I guess is the wireless chip.

I was of the assumption that the units communicated via the electrical wire only and had no wireless function however the EMR indicates otherwise, and that they may indeed communicate via a wireless chip.

Any help/ information will be much appreciated.

Thank you.
So what is the problem for you, how is this affecting your life, it looks like a cheap mains booster.?
 
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MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,201
First things first: if it's a wireless device you will find (1) an antenna, (2) wireless components. Can you identify either on the PCB anywhere? The BCM60500KFSBG is NOT a wireless device, it's specifically for communicating over power lines:

https://www.avnet.com/shop/us/produ...632304206?CMP=EMA_FindChips_inventoryfeed_VSE

Side note: this thing is for communicating at up to 1.5 Gbps over wires that wrap around a home. Of course there's going to be some leakage of EMR from the unshielded wires carrying that signal, and the parts in the outlet, and anything else made of metal that is connected. Plus that chip has an integrated switching regulator (hello EMR!), and I see at least one transformer on the PCB. It has an interface for communicating with WiFi chipsets, which it would not need if it were a wireless device itself. So in short, keep digging, you have not found any wireless hardware on that PCB yet.
 
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nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,284
All constructive feedback very much appreciated, we decided to wire the house years ago as a result of learning of the biological effects of EMR etc. Here are some of my notes on said topic;
https://www.evernote.com/shard/s693...Dzx9qeX614TrG1PojAIvTN3hiOHpBW0JSZFjvPHa7fLcw
Like I suspected, people (not you, IMO you're a victim of this fraud) making money on unscientific fears. I hate it with a passion.

From the notes:
Eye-opening interview with Claire Edwards cautions against 5G, a dangerous “space weapon”
PROOF: 5G and LED Lights are "LETHAL" Weapon Systems
Alex Jones Forewarned You Over 10 Years Ago Of The Smart Meter Roll-Out
FESIG 103rd Jeanice Barcelo The True Purpose for CERN & HAARP
5G: LONG RANGE URBAN TARGET ACQUISITION/KILL SYSTEM
5G Activated Zombie Apocalypse

on and on...
 
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Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
21,225

MrSoftware

Joined Oct 29, 2013
2,201
I love how the 5G tower down the road is a super duper crisis, but the WiFi radio in your pocket, that gives you EMR with literally exponentially higher intensity, is a non-issue... it's just so vacant of logic, where do you even begin to try to explain this to people who don't understand?
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,284
I try to show them they are victims of con men and scammers who make money on fear but it's hard to break any addiction and IMO they become addicted to the fear with a downward spiral of conspiracy theory draining their wallets much like drug addicts.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/mobile/anti-5g-devices-scams-online/
Well, as it turns out, this latest wave of EMF protection profiteering has been a long time in the making, and the folks behind it have been building up for years just to arrive at this moment.
..
On top of that, Digital Trends discovered that tech giants like Amazon, Facebook, and Google had let sellers, including Aires Tech, run advertisements despite explicit content policies against EMF-shielding products and pseudoscience.

Influencer marketing plays a key role as well. Companies including Aires Tech offer generous affiliate programs that reward people every time someone buys a product from their shared link. In an investor report, Aires Tech said it pays affiliates 10% to 20% commission. Amazon’s affiliate commission, in comparison, ranges from 1% to 9%.
...
Despite the science so evidently against them, anti-5G sellers have thrived by combining an almost cultlike following, the breakneck distribution of social media, and the abundance of e-commerce platforms. And with little to no regulatory oversight, they’ve managed to expand their line of fraudulent products with zero repercussions. As the false 5G narrative continues to gain momentum and the technology arrives in other regions, these accessories’ sales will only soar higher. The question is: Can the facts win out?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
18,522
I also have a complaint about the rush to 5G, but it has nothing to do with any radiated energy. It has to do with the haste to render the previous generation of hardware obsolete before it is even completely adopted. And certainly the majority of the push comes from the hardware sellers, NOT those folks who actually have the need to the faster data transmission rate.
Intentional obsolescence as a prime method of market boosting is also a factor in promoting lots of electronic waste, because of the in-compatible data schemes. Already I have seen discussions of what "6G" will provide, in a few publications.
 
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