Does a 6-pole, double-throw (2-way) switch exists? For hobby DC electronics

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
OK, so now we know that they are video signals. Probably running video signals to and from a toggle switch will leave you rather non-impressed with the results, because video, even composite video, gets up into the megahertz frequency range.
Now we know that the signals are analog, medium impedance, and fairly high frequency, and also not very many volts. There are several analog multiple switch ICs that would do the switching job very well. And a simple DC toggle switch could easily control them, while the sensitive wiring is all back inside a shielded box. And the whole setup should run less than $10 buying all new ICs at a less expensive supplier. It could even be done with a mechanical relay of the type intended for low level signals. Probably two banks of reed switches with a magnet to switch one or the other on. Small reed switches are fairly cheap. PLUS, you could shield the whole setup with aluminum or copper foil. That is about as cheap as I can get.
I thought we established the video signal is 15kHz RGBs. Is the MHz you mention something else?
 

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,990
This got way complicated, way fast. Wow, all that tech for just what I need? I guess...
That is the way a lot of things work. the much higher frequencies of the video signal take a bit of extra effort to handle without causing a loss of the higher frequency portion, resulting in a loss of detail and sharp line edges in the video. That is where the issue lies. But still it can be made to work cheap, just not simple.
 

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
That is the way a lot of things work. the much higher frequencies of the video signal take a bit of extra effort to handle without causing a loss of the higher frequency portion, resulting in a loss of detail and sharp line edges in the video. That is where the issue lies. But still it can be made to work cheap, just not simple.
I was hoping it would be as simple as making a "pass-thru" connection from one lead to another. In configuration A, it passes thru. In B, it doesn't (well, passes thru on the other terminal(s), eg dual-throw). :(
oh well
 

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
Well...is it RGB or isn’t it?
The output in one case is: RGBs ==> red, green, blue, composite-sync ==> one-to-one mapping to BNC connectors which a Sony PVM will accept.
And in the other is: RGBHVs ==>red, green, blue, horizontal-sync, vertical-sync. ==> soldered to female VGA 15 pin d-sub which goes to a 15kHz/240p-capable vga monitor

I should also mention, this tech [NESRGB] was chosen over other converter boards, or upscalers, etc. to keep the signal as pure and close to generated source as possible--you know, keep processing to minimum, (which sometimes manifests itself as input lag, input being hand video game controller, to what the eye sees on-screen).
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,990
A switching arrangement with reed switches could still be a quite simple solution. And I have seen them quite cheap for the small ones from surplus sellers like "ALL ELECTRONICS".
 
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