Does a 6-pole, double-throw (2-way) switch exists? For hobby DC electronics

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
I feel like the solution to my problem is way easy and I'm over thinking it, or just not using correct search terms. Very new to the hobby scene.

I simply have a small 5v DC circuit, with a set of 6 output pads I'd like to send to one place, or another, depending on switch position. Each final destination will also be 6 pads (I'm not combining leads here or anything--the 6 signals are always distinct).

But no mater the searches I do, no such switch seems to exist for purchase anywhere? I'm I calling it wrong (6-pole, double throw)? What other solution is there to send 6 wires (soldered to pads) to one of two locations (6 outs each), based on 2-way switch position?
 

dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
11,841
What are the voltage and current requirements for the switch?

Any constraints on area, power, cost, complexity?
 

recklessrog

Joined May 23, 2013
985
I solved a similar problem by using a single pole single throw switch to operate 3 relays with dp/dt contacts. That's if you can't get a suitable switch.
Another way could be to use a rotary wafer switch. They can be built from kits that are available with different options for the switching. If you choose to use them, be aware that some are "make before break" which means the next contact position is made before the current one is disconnected. This could lead to shorting in some applications. Others are "break before make" so check first.
 

mvas

Joined Jun 19, 2017
537
I feel like the solution to my problem is way easy and I'm over thinking it, or just not using correct search terms. Very new to the hobby scene.

I simply have a small 5v DC circuit, with a set of 6 output pads I'd like to send to one place, or another, depending on switch position. Each final destination will also be 6 pads (I'm not combining leads here or anything--the 6 signals are always distinct).

But no mater the searches I do, no such switch seems to exist for purchase anywhere? I'm I calling it wrong (6-pole, double throw)? What other solution is there to send 6 wires (soldered to pads) to one of two locations (6 outs each), based on 2-way switch position?
Search for "6PDT switch" or "6PDT relay"
 

eetech00

Joined Jun 8, 2013
2,033
I feel like the solution to my problem is way easy and I'm over thinking it, or just not using correct search terms. Very new to the hobby scene.

I simply have a small 5v DC circuit, with a set of 6 output pads I'd like to send to one place, or another, depending on switch position. Each final destination will also be 6 pads (I'm not combining leads here or anything--the 6 signals are always distinct).

But no mater the searches I do, no such switch seems to exist for purchase anywhere? I'm I calling it wrong (6-pole, double throw)? What other solution is there to send 6 wires (soldered to pads) to one of two locations (6 outs each), based on 2-way switch position?
Hi

Does your switch need only two positions? In other words, do you flip the switch back and forth between one of two positions only?

eT
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,948
I solved a similar problem by using a single pole single throw switch to operate 3 relays with dp/dt contacts. That's if you can't get a suitable switch.
Another way could be to use a rotary wafer switch. They can be built from kits that are available with different options for the switching. If you choose to use them, be aware that some are "make before break" which means the next contact position is made before the current one is disconnected. This could lead to shorting in some applications. Others are "break before make" so check first.
And when you are rotating the switch
no area constraints, power:?, const:cheap, complexity:simple.
You added a question mark when asked about power. Do you know how to get the power requirements? It’s easy to calculate.

For each of the six poles, what voltage are you switching? Then, for each of the six poles, what is the current draw of the switched load?

Then, calculate your power requirements. For each of the six poles, multiply the voltage by the current (in volts and amps). Power is this product.

P (watts) = V (volts) * I (amps)

The switch must be rated greater than the maximum of the six products.

I’m assuming this is DC, not AC? Correct??
 

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
And when you are rotating the switch


You added a question mark when asked about power. Do you know how to get the power requirements? It’s easy to calculate.

For each of the six poles, what voltage are you switching? Then, for each of the six poles, what is the current draw of the switched load?

Then, calculate your power requirements. For each of the six poles, multiply the voltage by the current (in volts and amps). Power is this product.

P (watts) = V (volts) * I (amps)

The switch must be rated greater than the maximum of the six products.

I’m assuming this is DC, not AC? Correct??
No need to assume, I clearly state its a DC circuit. I even say it's 5V. I'm pretty sure the power draw is small, like in the mA range, I don't know 200-ish?
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,948
“Maybes” result in bad designs. Do you know how to use a meter to measure current?

If you don’t have a switch yet, set your meter to measure amps on an appropriate scale. Since I don’t know what you have, I can’t specify a specific setting.

Then place the meter probes across each pair of wires, with the circuit powered. Some of the lines may need to actually be doing something, as idle vs active current are different. Read the value.

If you want, you can calculate based on your guesses. 5V times 0.2A is how many Watts... But don’t guess.

Now that you’ve measured actual values, you can calculate the power as I’ve outlined before.
 

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
“Maybes” result in bad designs. Do you know how to use a meter to measure current?

If you don’t have a switch yet, set your meter to measure amps on an appropriate scale. Since I don’t know what you have, I can’t specify a specific setting.

Then place the meter probes across each pair of wires, with the circuit powered. Some of the lines may need to actually be doing something, as idle vs active current are different. Read the value.

If you want, you can calculate based on your guesses. 5V times 0.2A is how many Watts... But don’t guess.

Now that you’ve measured actual values, you can calculate the power as I’ve outlined before.
Yes I have multimeter and know how to measure curent. I’m using un-certain terms because I’m not in front of my circuit right now.
And the other assumption I’m making is, finding all this data out (per your questions)....will that really solve my initial problem? Will knowing exact power draw start magically making search engines give me better results to finding a 6PDT 2-way switch?
Maybe? I’m open to doing whatever it takes
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,948
Yes I have multimeter and know how to measure curent. I’m using un-certain terms because I’m not in front of my circuit right now.
And the other assumption I’m making is, finding all this data out (per your questions)....will that really solve my initial problem? Will knowing exact power draw start magically making search engines give me better results to finding a 6PDT 2-way switch?
Maybe? I’m open to doing whatever it takes
What it will do, is allow you to determine if the switches that you find are appropriate for your circuit.

You can find a “6PDT 2-way switch”, that will burn up the first time you use it without doing the work necessary to determine your real requirements.

What about the switches that WBahn linked for you?

I have a couple of comments. Please explain what about a “...DT” switch is not a “2-way” switch? The additional words are redundant and may prevent a search engine from finding what you want.

I just quickly performed a search for “6PDT switch” and got several results. Try it and tell me what happens.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
6,948
Yeah, same here. Problem is, click on any one of them, they’re NOT 6PDT switches
Ok, we seem to have a communication problem here. Or a misunderstanding of the terms. Whatever you think is a 6PDT switch is NOT a 6PDT switch.

I did the search again, clicked on the results and all I could see was 6PDT switches. Can you post a link to a 6PDT switch that ISN’T a 6PDT switch?

And perhaps you could describe what you think a 6PDT switch does?
 

Thread Starter

msaucedo99

Joined Mar 8, 2019
15
Ok, we seem to have a communication problem here. Or a misunderstanding of the terms. Whatever you think is a 6PDT switch is NOT a 6PDT switch.

I did the search again, clicked on the results and all I could see was 6PDT switches. Can you post a link to a 6PDT switch that ISN’T a 6PDT switch?

And perhaps you could describe what you think a 6PDT switch does?
No, we’re talking about the same thing here. I guess my issue was the first link posted here was kinda pricey at $25. Then the others didn’t have the exact pole type switch I was looking for. But yes, I have tons to search thru now, and will just have to settle. Thanks everyone for helping out
 
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