Convert ordinary pcb to smaller pcb that uses smd?

Thread Starter

spikespiegelbebop

Joined Nov 30, 2021
63
Hello, I have the following diagrams and pcb artwork, and I would like to know how should I proceed to convert it to a small pcb that uses smd components. Can you guys tell me if pcb way can make that conversion for me? Or should I use some kind of special software?

In shortly, I just need to make that PCB smaller, make it use smd components, but not all the components need to be smd, the ic can be on normal size.


acvid[1].pngacvid_pcb[1].png
power[1].png
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
30,438
There is likely no automated way to do this conversion.
You will have to lay out a new board with the SMD component pads.
 

djsfantasi

Joined Apr 11, 2010
8,444
Curious… Where did you get the original board layout?

I agree with the other posters. There is no software to perform the conversion. So you have to redo the layout manually. There is free software available for that. Kicad has been mentioned. I use Diptrace.

The original layout appears to have traces go all over the place. By moving the major components around, you can get a better layout.

Here is an example of a PCB I made some time ago. Note the difference in how the traces run. The board you posted appears to be a video board and trace layout is critical to its Operstion.

EC5C5975-3F93-4F47-80AC-692C6B88238E.png9398CA10-9A1D-4126-8251-771F5F593EC7.png
 

Thread Starter

spikespiegelbebop

Joined Nov 30, 2021
63
Superb, you made everything clean and saved space. Well guys, I'm willing to do this by myself, but I've never used that software.
Is there any tutorial teaching how to use it to draw a PCB that uses SMD components?
 

Thread Starter

spikespiegelbebop

Joined Nov 30, 2021
63
So this Kicad is like any other ordinary PCB design software. Neat. That makes everything easier, I won't end up needing to watch every single video now. I know how to create diagrams in this kind of software, but I don't know how to convert them to a pcb with 2 or 3 layers for using with SMD. Can you tell me which videos to watch, in order to solve my problem?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,697
Some times it is more efficient to use a few jumpers than to go to a double sided PCB. That can be a great way to reduce the cost of board production.
 

panic mode

Joined Oct 10, 2011
2,215
this will cost couple of bucks per board and that will cover all SMD parts and assembly. just keep all SMD parts on same side of the board, and manually solder any THT parts like SCART connector. also no reason to limit yourself to single layer, boards with 2 4 or 6 layers will usually cost you the same.

since you are new to EDA, workflow is to create schematics by inserting parts, assigning them values and footprints and connecting them. if needed add, create or import any missing parts, symbols and footprints.

then create board layout. this means arrange parts the way you like, create net classes to define trace widths for things like power and signal, then route all connections. You can use 3D view to see how your creation is to look like.

finally when you are happy with the look, generate output files (gerbers, drill, centroid, BOM) and use one of the many PCB makers websites to get instant quote. for small batch and if ordering boards only, usually shipping costs more than the boards.
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,697
If you are having circuit boards professionally made, a single sided board will likely cost MORE than double-sided in relatively small quantities.
A single sided board WITHOUT plated through holes is a simpler process. And board with NO HOLES can be cheaper yet, if the batch can be panelized.
 

ag-123

Joined Apr 28, 2017
259
There is some tutorial's link I posted that touch on the basics of Kicad and use SMT .
Here it is by Niklas Wennerstrand, https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/threads/useful-links-for-learning-kicad.164953/
BTW, the new version 6 of Kicad has a very large libraries of parts.
I started in KiCad with this set of videos by Shawn Hymel (Digi-Key)

I think they are pretty good "quick start" tutorials, quite a bit of things to learn for starters.
I went from there with schematics etc to making protoboards (perfboards) with the components properly laid out on a 2.54mm 0.1" grid.
KiCad is a productive tool.

For SMD, I've not really tried, but I think SMD boards can be pretty compact by using the smaller component sizes.
I'm not sure about in practice if using making PCBs with smaller components would be more difficult than the larger ones. Some tiny boards are crammed packed with tiny components, examples are like those of smart watches. Some placement tolerances are so tight, I'd think it'd need a pretty good magnifier to just work with them.
 
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Jon Chandler

Joined Jun 12, 2008
294
A single sided board WITHOUT plated through holes is a simpler process. And board with NO HOLES can be cheaper yet, if the batch can be panelized.
It may indeed be a simpler process. However, if you are using a Chinese fab to make boards, it's not the common process, so they may not even provide the service.

If you meant that it's an easier DIY process, sure, you're right. But creating a one-off fine-pitch board at home and assembling a non-solder-masked board successfully is kind of a stretch. If that was your intent, it wasn't clear, especially since you mention panelizing.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
12,697
I have only used local board houses and so that is my experience.
As for changing the layout to use SMD parts, for the circuit shown the new board will be a totally different design. Runners between IC pins will be a challenge using the SMD IC devices.
BUT using standard IC s with leads on 0.10 inch spacing can work out rather well for manual assembly, with the pin portions bent out to allow surface attachment. That also makes replacement MUCH EASIER than thru-hole attachment. The TS did not mention how many of the boards would be built, that does affect quite a few options.
 
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