Art Project - Artificial Vein System with Peristaltic Pump

Thread Starter

sawyer000000

Joined Nov 12, 2023
3
Hi there! First time posting :)

I am an artist and this may seem like a totally entry level series of questions but I am a total newbie at all things electrical apart from small projects in school, and I am looking to embark on a kind of involved (for me) project that incorporates some DIY electrical and water and would love some advice. Basically, I am attempting to create an artificial vein system of tubing with liquid inside and believe that I will need a pump that is as small and inexpensive as possible and that does not need to be submerged in water. My questions and current found materials are the below:

1: Will it work as a closed system, e.g. just the tubing filled with liquid going in and out of the pump, no tank or liquid reservoir.
2: I know nothing about voltage, could this pump be connected to neg/pos wiring, then to a USB wire (I stripped an old charger, there were 2 cords inside, could attach to pos/neg?) and then to a portable charger, this one I have, it says it is '5VDC' does that mean it can only power a 5V pump? Should I get this one instead? Flow rate is not a problem, as long as its moving at all.
3: Should I be worried about safety regarding leakage/short circuiting with these electrics?

Any feedback and suggestions are welcomed!

xx
 

LowQCab

Joined Nov 6, 2012
3,937
What You need is not cheap, and runs on ~120VAC.

Peristaltic-Pumps are commonly used in
large Commercial-Pool Chemical-Metering-Systems
where they often pump Liquid-Chlorine and Muriatic-Acid to
maintain Pool-Sanitation and general Water cleanliness.

All have either an Electronic-Timer, or a Mechanical-Timer, built-in,
that can be easily set to simulate a Heartbeat-pulse.

But like I said, they start out somewhere around ~$300.oo each,
and that was back in the mid ~90's.
 

Thread Starter

sawyer000000

Joined Nov 12, 2023
3
What You need is not cheap, and runs on ~120VAC.

Peristaltic-Pumps are commonly used in
large Commercial-Pool Chemical-Metering-Systems
where they often pump Liquid-Chlorine and Muriatic-Acid to
maintain Pool-Sanitation and general Water cleanliness.

All have either an Electronic-Timer, or a Mechanical-Timer, built-in,
that can be easily set to simulate a Heartbeat-pulse.

But like I said, they start out somewhere around ~$300.oo each,
and that was back in the mid ~90's.
Thanks for taking the time! What do you think of the ones in the hyperlink I included in the original post? They are not liekly as nice, efficient, or long lasting as what you are referencing, but would they at least function?
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
17,790
There is another common application of Peristaltic-Pumps, which is in medical IV pumps. Those devices are always smaller than the pool chemical units, and almost always are packaged with a mains powered supply and low voltage battery backup. Some of the versions are considered disposable, and those would be what I suggest. Convincing others that the intended application is not medical may be the challenge
One other application would be to make such a pump, the mechanism is not so very complex.
And one more option could be a mechanical drive scheme for one of the small squeeze-bulb pumps that are used for a variety of applications. A simple gearmotor and crank could provide the motion, and the effect would be very similar to an actual heartbeat. And the materials should be readily available and less expensive.
 
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