220V electric stove wiring

Thread Starter

kitchenwoman

Joined Nov 26, 2020
7
Lay woman – seeks advice on 220 volt stove wiring.
The infinity switch of my front 8” burner of my electrical Maytag stove has gone hay wire. When the front knob is turned off, the switch is still on as the burner element is hot. There is also corrosion on the receptacle. I have seen the video how to change these two but it’s a job beyond me. The truth is this is the only burner I have used – its time I use the other 3 burners. I want to cease using this faulty burner and totally disable it. As in the future I may want to use these wires connected to the switch I don’t want to take the metal clips or terminals off and put the wires in caps. I intend to disconnect all the 5 terminals into this switch, possibly tape them off with electrical tape, leave them hanging inside and throw away the infinity switch they were connected to. As I am totally ignorant about electrical circuits and not sure if these wires that had gone into this switch would be still be carrying current I fear I may be inviting a short circuit. please advise me if what I plan to do is hazardous and if so what is the best way to disable this burner
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
7,751
As you suspect, some (including me) would say that what you are planning to do has its hazards. Looking at the wiring of your stove might seem like a simple thing to modify but I don't work on my own house's electrical system because I am probably not aware of the finer points that can make the difference between carefree operation and a small fire or worse. That's why we have professionals around.
 

Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
10,050
Post pictures of the switch it would help us better, sounds like the switch is faulty if it still keeps working in the Off position, ..
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
Is this how it is wired (source: Google images):
1606476675308.png
Presumably the switch has lots of safety features and disconnecting the burner will stop it from heating. But, I would still be concerned about a defective switch that was connected to L1 and L2 (power for 220 V USA). Thus, I would remove the switch as you suggest. As for the pilot light, I would disconnect it on both ends as well. If yours is attached to the neutral, that is not such a big concern, but I would still do it.

What to do with the wires would be my biggest concern. I would not trust ordinary black PVC electrical tape inside a stove top. My approach would depend on how the wires are terminated. Pictures would help. The wires may actually go to some central terminal/distribution strip that would allow them to be removed completely. Then the problem would be easy to solve.
 

Thread Starter

kitchenwoman

Joined Nov 26, 2020
7
Thanks to all who replied and especially to jpanhalt yes that’s the switch. I have the same stove as featured in you-tube's “replace infinity switch on Maytag stove”. The wires end in metal clips as the video shows. I like to keep these clips on as some day i may put them back on. I could possibly do as video shows but the problem is the receptacle (incidentally no stock in whole of B.C.) which is releasing white powder – a change job I won’t be capable of doing. I am terrified of leaving this defective switch as it is as I have received a huge spark. My options now seem to be spending approximately Canadian $100 on parts (which include mailing cost for the receptable from somewhere) and another $100 for a technician to come in or get a new stove-seems much because a switch went haywire.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
I agree about removing it. This connectors are called "spade" connectors. The part attached to the wire is "female" in the case of your oven. That is typical. Components, switches, relays, etc. (probable the burner too) will have the male part. What you are looking for is an insulated male blank (not sure of the name). I think something like this (insulated male connector) would work though.

1606504717750.png

The heavy plastic should provide protection from shorts. For an added safety measure, you could put heat shrink over it. Then while the heatshrink is hot, squeeze with it some sort of pliers or forcep. That will seal the smaller open end. Long nose pliers work great for that, but anything will do.

Be sure to number or label what you take of. The wires are bundled, and I would leave them that way.

As for removing the spade male from female, the author in that YT does what I do, but I didn't notice that he mentioned it. Do not just pull to get then appart. When the connection finally comes apart, your hands will fly apart. Instead, use some leverage. He uses his thumb or index finger. You can also use a wide screwdriver blade. Then wiggle and work the connectors apart.

Someone will remind you do be sure the stove/oven are disconnected from the power when you do this. I assume you knew that.

I am not sure what you mean by "receptacle." Do you mean the female part of the connection or somewhere else? If the female part of the connector, it is probably some corrosion (oxidation product) of the plating. It is likely tin oxide and is not particularly dangerous.
 
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Dodgydave

Joined Jun 22, 2012
10,050
If it's an oven or high KW Heater, chances are it will be crimp without plastic covers, or maybe ceramic terminals,

if they are wires I would use ceramic terminal block to isolate the loose wires instead of pvc tape.


51daBjbmNlL._SL1100_.jpg
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
I suggest you review the aforementioned YT. It gets warm in the area of the switch, but not hot. Typical uninsulated spade connectors were used by the manufacturer.
 

Thread Starter

kitchenwoman

Joined Nov 26, 2020
7
receptacle.pnga million thanks to jpanhalt and dodgydave. the receptable is the female part where the two male ends of the heating element go inside. If corrosion isnt a problem i may think about replacing the switch and use this favorite front burner. Replacing the receptable was the tough job I didn't want try. I just want to be sure I wasn't going get a spark or a short because the corrosion is causing the switch to mal-function.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
11,088
Stoves need to be re-engineered. I am guilty of using mostly the front, right burner on my glass top range. It's the only large one that has an inner heat zone for smaller pots and splatters don't get on the controls as much..

I wouldn't worry too much about the corrosion. A part of it is normal. I had to replace the broiler element in my stove last year. It did fail in a spectacular manner while I was broiling dinner, however. Its contacts were like you describe for the burners.
 

K OBrien

Joined Nov 28, 2020
14
You can purchase a universal model for 8" burners for less than $20 US online. They function in a manner similar to a dimmer light switch which is why they are infinitely variable. You can safely work on the stove by shutting off what is probably a 60 amp double pole breaker or pulling the range fuse in your fuse box. If nothing that ordinarily works on the stove doesn't than you can be sure it is safe to work on. If you just want to disconnect it. You don't even need to remove the switch you just need to pull the wires at the spade ends (not by the wire) by hand or with a pair or long nose pliers. Just remove H1 AND H2 that will keep both the burner and switch (but not the pilot light) from operating. It is safer to leave L1 and L2 connected that way they can't flop around and short to the metal housing. Pull both wires away from the switch and tape them around the wiring harness for later use (they will not be hot later on if you removed both). When you replace H1 and H2 it makes no difference if they get swapped as long as the burner and wires are good. It's always easier to take off the spade terminals first and then remove and replace the switch unless you can't reach the spades. They need to fit on rather tight to make good connections. You shouldn't have corrosion at the receptacle unless water has been getting into it. Corrosion makes resistance and high current like in a stove, oven and burners through resistance makes heat and heat can make fire.

The three terminals next to each other are for L1, L2 (Power) and P for the pilot light. H1 and H2 are for the heating element.
Amazon Universal infinite switch for 8 inch burner.
 

K OBrien

Joined Nov 28, 2020
14
L1, L2 (Power) and P for the pilot light. H1 and H2 are for the heating element. All not always necessarily true, in general Black and Red are L1 and L2 Blue is for the Pilot Light and the wires with a special coating go to the burner because they need to be heat resistant. All the switches should be wired with the same color code. If the new switch isn't exactly the same. Match the letter/numbers on the switch with the colors to the letter/numbers on the old switch. If L1 and L2 are swapped then the pilot light might not work.
 
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Thread Starter

kitchenwoman

Joined Nov 26, 2020
7
thanks K O'Brien. looks now i need replace the receptable to get burner working properly. very likely water got there. there was a spark with the element removed. long before all this happened i had a warning from the main stove pilot light. It was on even when none of the burners or oven was on but i ignored it. looks like i need disconnect the P1, pilot light wire if i opt to disable this switch completely. will think over which of the 2 options, disable or replace, to take. thanks again
 

K OBrien

Joined Nov 28, 2020
14
I see some replacement burner receptacles also available on Amazon.ca Amazon Canada Range Top Burner kit. You'll need a pair of wire strippers for cutting and stripping the old wires at the receptacles. When stripping the old be careful not to cut off some or nich the strands by using too small of a hole in the strippers. Twist the stripped wires together and then twist the porcelain wire nuts on them. Put the shrink tube over the top and hit it with a hot hair dryer to shrink the tube over the splice/wire nut.

If you leave the pilot wire connected it will give you a false signal. If you take it off put a piece of black electrical tape to cover the wire side of the bare metal part of the push on connector for the pilot light since unlike (H1 and H2) removing both makes both sides dead. If the pilot light wire were to touch the metal case it could possible give a false signal and/or proved an unwanted electrical path. As a general law for current to flow there must be a complete path. The current would flow into the pilot light and then it must flow back out to either the neutral for 110 volts or the other side of the line for 220 volts. That's why you should tape over the pilot wire connector.
 

Thread Starter

kitchenwoman

Joined Nov 26, 2020
7
thanks again brien . i decided to replace switch and receptacle. the universal switch 316436001 does look a lot like my 7403p372-60 (not 237) but the amps differ slightly. do you think i get by with the cheaper universal switch?
 

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Thread Starter

kitchenwoman

Joined Nov 26, 2020
7
universal switch is 8.8-10.8a. my maytag is 8.9-11.0 a. Will the former (cheaper) work for me. someone in amazon.com says no. Says former is for frigidaire. Advice appreciated.
 
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